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Women Unbound Challenge (2010)



My favorite genre is women fiction! I tend to prefer books written from the female viewpoint, may be because of the lesser obsession with sex in female-oriented books, or may be simply because I can identify with them better. As if I don't read enough books that are women-centered, here's a challenge to read more books focused on women or feminism. This challenge is hosted at Women Unbound and runs from November 1, 2009 till November 30, 2010. I plan to join at the Bluestocking level and read 5 books, of at least 2 are nonfiction.

So here are the books I plan to read:

Fiction
1. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
2. Climbing the Stairs by Padma Venkatraman
3. Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See

Non-fiction
4. Embroideries by Marjane Satrapi
5. Denial by Jessica Stern

Here's the Start-of-challenge meme questions and my answers!
1. What does feminism mean to you? Does it have to do with the work sphere? The social sphere? How you dress? How you act?
The first thought that comes to my mind when I think of feminism is total freedom for the women. I hate to be dependent on anyone, much as I hate anyone telling me what to do and what not to. It could be with regards to something as simple as walking across the street or talking to a long-time male friend, but I believe the woman has the right to decide for herself what she wishes to do. For me feminism is not just equal rights, but rather an acceptance by the male and female community of their equivalence in all matters.

2. Do you consider yourself a feminist? Why or why not?
The meaning of feminism has been twisted around so much to make it appear as some evil vehement creature. I don't consider myself a feminist in the sense of trying to convince people of my views. Rather I hold on to my views, apply them strongly in my life, and do not bend them for anyone. At one time, I used to rigorously try to help the women folk I was associated with, but their lack of conviction or desire to change sort of broke me badly. Ever since, I only tried to set myself as an example but I am yet to bounce back to my old active ways.

3. What do you consider the biggest obstacle women face in the world today? Has that obstacle changed over time, or does it basically remain the same?
Currently, I feel that it is women themselves who are their biggest hurdle to their freedom. On the one hand, we have women fighting for their freedom, on the other hand, we have women who have either given up on it or never taken it up. If there's one thing I detest more than men and government belittling women, it is women belittling themselves.

So that's it for now. If you wish to sign-up, head over to Women Unbound Challenge

Comments

Care said…
Thank you for joining Women Unbound. I'll be reading The Bell Jar, too.

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