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LOTR Read-Along: Fighting battles and Casting the ring into the Fire

I know my review for The Two Towers is still pending, but I decided to go ahead and post this 13-day late intro post for The Return of the King.

This month, Maree @ Just add books is hosting the Readalong for the third book of the LOTR trilogy. What a wonderful journey this has been! I am glad I decided to re-read this book! This is without doubt, one of the best sagas ever!

This is the only book of the trilogy that I have read just once. I *tried* to read it the first and second times, but the journey became too depressing for me. This, in spite of already knowing how it will end. So then, I would skip quite a few chapters in between and go right to the end. ::blush::

Here's the cover of my book. Love the illustration of one of the most uplifting scenes in the book, when Frodo and Sam lay down spent amidst all the destruction happening around. There's an eagle in the cover too (not clear), and the tiny figure standing on one of the rocks in Gandalf.

Anyways, Maree has asked a set of interesting questions, for this month's read.

We're coming to the end of the quest. Where are you in your reading?
I haven't opened this book yet. I was late finishing The Two Towers and took a short break to catch up with the rest of my books. It could be a while before I pick this book up for reading.

Have you read LOTR before? If so, what are you anticipating most re-reading in ROTK? (er ... try to avoid spoilers, although I suppose that question makes that a bit tricky)
I am looking forward to the two battles in the book (if my memory serves me right). I can't wait to see Aragorn reclaim his lost glory. Most importantly, I want to be able to read the whole book successfully, even the dark portions that turned me off earlier!

Who's your favourite character in ROTK?
My favorite character is Eowyn. I love the courage she shows in a battle waged only by men, and really adore Tolkien for giving her a meaty role in the book.

Favourite scene?
The entire battle of the Pelennor Fields. It is also my favorite scene from the movie!

How do you feel about the overall series now that we're getting near the end?
Terribly sad! This is a saga that I wished never ended. I can't imagine the withdrawal symptoms I will have once I am done!

Does reading the books make you want to watch the movies, or run screaming in the other direction?
Since the movies were the main reason I read these books, I can't say I would ever run away! Rather I love the movies!!

Comments

jenclair said…
I love the Trilogy and have re-read it a couple of times over the years. My favorite is still the first one.
Tales of Whimsy said…
I reaallllly need to read these one day.
Maree said…
Oh yay, I'm glad you're enjoying taking the journey with us! :D
Beth F said…
I love the last book -- if you haven't read it through in a while, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by how much is in it.
Athira said…
jenclair, that's my favorite too! :)

Juju, I sure hope you get to it! :)

Maree, Totally loving it! I'm glad I found out about this read-a-long!

Beth, I am so looking forward to reading the last one! I'm sure I have forgotten about a lot of things.
J.G. said…
I'm with you on the battle of the Pelennor Fields, especially the first charge. I really like Theoden, and there's something so moving about the shift of the wind, the rooster crowing, the horns and the banner of the White Horse. That scene just doesn't get old!
Athira said…
J.G., you took the words from my mouth!! The Pelennor Fields battle remains my favorite!

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