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Waltzing in the Music City | Weekly Snapshot

If you're in the US, do you have Monday off from work or school, to observe President's Day? All of us at our home do, which is lucky because this isn't a day that every company or institution observes with a day off. Even though it's not been too long since the Christmas and New Year holiday season, I'd been pining for a vacation for a while - something either low-key or relaxing that even the kids will enjoy.


Currently This post is coming to you from the Music City - Nashville - where we are spending the long weekend. We are technically here only for two days and will leave early on Monday so that we are home in time to pick our dog from boarding. Although I don't personally care much for the music scene other than to listen to what's popular on the radio, I had been hoping to stop by Nashville someday and check it out.

We are staying at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, which is a sight in itself, with its acres and acres of gardens and walkways. It's def…

Look at what just arrived! - May 17, 2010


Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Eva @ A Striped Armchair and Marg @ Reading Adventures that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

Nothing in the mail this week, which is quite weird, since I'm expecting some books. Anyways, I visited the library a few times and that was compensation enough. I finished four of the books I picked, and am halfway through two others. Here's the bunch that I looted!


  1. Chicken with Plums by Marjane Satrapi: I hope Marjane Satrapi keeps writing graphic novels. I enjoy the humorous style in which she tells dark tragic stories. This was a brilliant read!
  2. Saving CeeCee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman: Lovely book! CeeCee and her motley crew of characters make for one lively cast.
  3. The Lion's Game by Nelson DeMille: Aah, a John Corey book! You got to love him! This one is pretty long, and not as enjoyable as Plum Island, but John Corey's signature sarcasm keeps things lively. I'm just a quarter way in.
  4. The Motorcycle Diaries by Che Guevara: I am halfway through this book and find it good. This is a journal rather than a memoir, so it has a journal's characteristics of rambling thoughts. But it is still pretty well written and I particularly enjoyed reading Che's insights into each significant event.
  5. Asterios Polyp by David Mazzucchelli: I heard of this book only when it won the LA Times Book Prize for Graphic Novels. I wasn't particularly impressed by it, but it was definitely enjoyable.
  6. Blankets by Craig Thompson: Another book that comes strongly recommended.
  7. The Arrival by Shaun Tan: Can you imagine a story told only in pictures, with no dialogues? For such a book to be a success, the illustrator has to be a gem of a story-teller. His story should be able to express the same feelings and ideas as words would do. I finished The Arrival on Saturday, and I can assure you that this is a brilliant book!
What do you think of any of these books?

Comments

Bookventures said…
These are all great books. Happy Reading!!!
bermudaonion said…
The only one I've read is Saving CeeCee Honeycutt and I loved it! Books never come when you expect them. Happy reading!
Tales of Whimsy said…
Ooo what's the first one about?
erisian said…
is that blankets the novel or the graphic novel?

If the graphic.. hooray! i love d it.
if the standard novel, let us know how you like it... i didnt even know it existed till a week ago and am very curious
Suko said…
Wow! I'd most like to read #1, #6, and #7. I hope you enjoy them all.

Here's my mailbox: http://suko95.blogspot.com/2010/05/mailbox-monday-more-books.html

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