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Review: Read, Remember, Recommend by Rachelle Rogers Knight


So, after seeing this book on so many blogs, I very much wanted my own copy of this book. Luckily for me, I won this one through a giveaway on Rachelle's website, Bibliobabe, and as soon as this book arrived home, I have been hooked to it. It is one amazing journal, and I'm sure every book lover will be glad to have it in his or her collection.

Read, Remember, Recommend is primarily a reader's journal. It is divided into six sections. The delight of this journal is the Awards list. I had so much fun going through the various awards, and in the process found many fascinating ones. It made me wish that I could pick each book and read them. I already follow the Pulitzer, the Orange and the Commonwealth Writers' Prizes. I've added a few more to that list based on the book titles, and would love to read some of the titles from those lists. This journal also has some blank lists, where you can keep your own personal lists, and I found that highly helpful, since I do lists all the time.

This journal has several pages dedicated to keeping a record of books read and recommended. I wish there were more pages dedicated to this section, but I'm sure that no matter how many pages are there, it will never be enough. Alternatively, one can take copies of the journal pages and add them when one runs out of pages - but I would not like pages sticking out of my books. However, if the binding had been different - the kind that can be used to add and remove pages, then I would love the idea of adding more pages.

Read, Remember, Recommend also has a loaner list, where we can record books lent and borrowed. This is something I really need. While I rarely borrow books (library doesn't count), I do lend books once in a while, and then I obsessively worry about when that book will be returned. Not cool at all! So this is a great thing for the likes of me, but of course, there are only limited pages, that again, copies will have to be made. (I think an online editable version of this book would be a great sell!)

And finally, there are loads of resources on bookish websites and book blogs, that I had a hard time tearing myself away from it. My addiction to bookish websites knows no bounds, and currently my Google Reader is suffering. There is so much information in those pages, and also in the awards lists, that I will keep going back to them once in a while to check out what I missed!


Check out this book published by Sourcebooks @ Goodreads, BetterWorldBooks, Amazon, B&N.

I won this book via a giveaway.

Comments

Sounds like a fun book. For Christmas I got a Reader's Journal where I can keep track of my books. I thought i would use it a lot, but have discovered that my blog is really my journal (and I have an excel spreadsheet that I use). I do like the idea of all the prize lists
I got mine yesterday and have only thumbed through it. I have to say it is going to be helpful in organization that I am seriously lacking. Great review of it!
bermudaonion said…
I love this reading journal too and keep it on my computer desk. I find myself flipping through it all the time.
This is SO useful! I need to buy this.
booknerdgirl said…
I've never heard of this book because I'm a new blogger but sounds like a great resource thanks!
Anonymous said…
By the sound of it, this is EXACTLY what I need! What a fabulous book, thanks for letting me know.. I'm fairly new to the blogging world (6 months) so it's always great to come across posts like this.
Ash said…
I already have my Moleskine Book Journal but this sounds quite a bit different and definitely looks like something I would really enjoy. I haven't seen this anywhere so I'm glad I ran across your review.
The books loaned page would be really helpful for me. I always forget who has my books. I just started writing it down in a little notebook, but I'm worried that will get lost. Glad you like this one!
Introverted Jen said…
Great review! I like your idea of being able to add pages. I got Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Journal last year for my birthday, but I find that I don't use it that often. All my online sites work well enough. (I have a "loaned" shelf on GoodReads" to help me keep track of who I've loaned books to).
I have been pining after this one. Oh, to have all of that in one place would be heavenly.
Rebecca Chapman said…
I will be sure to read this book one day. Rachelle is such a lovely person, as well as a wonderful one for putting together such a great tool. She actually designed by header and blog button so I am eternally greatful to her.

I like you blog by the way, you read such a variety of books. just became a new follower
Athira said…
Helen, the prize lists was what I was most looking forward to. I'm so glad to have them all in one place!

Felicia, I agree! I hate having to keep adding books in goodreads, so this will be a welcome way to keep track of reading out of award lists.

Kathy, mine is in the bookshelf right now, but I need to move it to a more convenient position.

Emidy, I hope you do!

booknerdgirl, I hope you get it too!

mywordlyobsessions, this is certainly a huge resource! I love it!

Ash, it certainly is different, I guess. I'm not much into writing down books I read, but award lists - they are a whole different thing!

Kim, hehe, I hear ya! I forget that too, and sometimes never get them back. Sigh!

Jen, loaned shelf on goodreads is a great idea! I'll have to borrow that one!

Gwen, I hope you get one! This one is so good!

Becky, wow! That is great to hear that she designed the header for your blog! I've been looking for someone to do that for me too!

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