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When you are LOST in a book | Weekly Snapshot

I have just spent a bulk of my past 24 waking hours racing through the book Big Little Lies. Gosh, it feels amazing to be so consumed by a book that all you want to do is read it at every small or big opportunity. It was hard putting the book down or not thinking about Madeline, Jane, Celeste, or their terribly convoluted lives when I was supposed to be doing something else.


Last Week We drove back from Nashville on Monday morning after two full fun days at the Gaylord resort and one morning at the Hermitage, President Jackson's house. The house itself was glorious (and huge!) - we all enjoyed a good amount of history that day. The resort was a feast for the eyes - all those trees and gardens inside the massive building!

On our drive back home, we had couple of hours to kill so we took the kids to the Dinosaur World in Kentucky. That turned out to be a good decision as the kids had a blast and the adults also had fun learning something new.

Currently This weekend is so far turning…

Friday Finds -- August 13, 2010


Friday FindsHosted by MizB at Should be reading, this meme asks you what great books did you hear about/discover this past week?

I've come across some really exciting books over the last couple of weeks. Although I had been busy, I still managed to go through my Google Reader.

Life as we Knew it by Susan Beth Pfeffer

I've realized that I quite enjoy dystopian or apocalyptic books or movies. (I was the only one in my group who actually enjoyed the movie 2012.) So when I recently saw this book reviewed at Alyce's At Home with Books, I knew I had to read this for sure!
It's almost the end of Miranda's sophomore year in high school, and her journal reflects the busy life of a typical teenager: conversations with friends, fights with mom, and fervent hopes for a driver's license. When Miranda first begins hearing the reports of a meteor on a collision course with the moon, it hardly seems worth a mention in her diary. But after the meteor hits, pushing the moon off its axis and causing worldwide earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes, all the things Miranda used to take for granted begin to disappear. Food and gas shortages, along with extreme weather changes, come to her small Pennsylvania town; and Miranda's voice is by turns petulant, angry, and finally resigned, as her family is forced to make tough choices while they consider their increasingly limited options. Yet even as suspicious neighbors stockpile food in anticipation of a looming winter without heat or electricity, Miranda knows that that her future is still hers to decide even if life as she knew it is over.

Half the Sky by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

When I first saw this book, I was attracted to the cover. All those women from across the world gracing the cover, and that blue sky looks so magnificent. And then, Helen @ Helen's Book Blog wrote a wonderful review of this book. (You have to check out Helen's blog! I have come across so many wonderful books at her site.)
With Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn as our guides, we undertake an odyssey through Africa and Asia to meet the extraordinary women struggling there, among them a Cambodian teenager sold into sex slavery and an Ethiopian woman who suffered devastating injuries in childbirth. Drawing on the breadth of their combined reporting experience, Kristof and WuDunn depict our world with anger, sadness, clarity, and, ultimately, hope.

They show how a little help can transform the lives of women and girls abroad. That Cambodian girl eventually escaped from her brothel and, with assistance from an aid group, built a thriving retail business that supports her family. The Ethiopian woman had her injuries repaired and in time became a surgeon. A Zimbabwean mother of five, counseled to return to school, earned her doctorate and became an expert on AIDS. Through these stories, Kristof and WuDunn help us see that the key to economic progress lies in unleashing women’s potential.

Comments

I like the premise of Half the Sky!

Read about my Friday Find!
bermudaonion said…
Half the Sky looks fantastic to me! Have a great weekend.
Half the Sky sounds really beautiful! I'd love to read it. I did read Life as we Knew It, though. It was enjoyable, but not one of the best books out there. Cool finds!
Alyce said…
I hope you love Life as We Knew It!

Half the Sky sounds very hope-filled and uplifting for a book about such serious topics.
Life As We Knew It was definitely one of my favorite reads last year -- it was so thought-provoking, and I literally couldn't stop reading. Definitely recommend it!

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