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Waltzing in the Music City | Weekly Snapshot

If you're in the US, do you have Monday off from work or school, to observe President's Day? All of us at our home do, which is lucky because this isn't a day that every company or institution observes with a day off. Even though it's not been too long since the Christmas and New Year holiday season, I'd been pining for a vacation for a while - something either low-key or relaxing that even the kids will enjoy.


Currently This post is coming to you from the Music City - Nashville - where we are spending the long weekend. We are technically here only for two days and will leave early on Monday so that we are home in time to pick our dog from boarding. Although I don't personally care much for the music scene other than to listen to what's popular on the radio, I had been hoping to stop by Nashville someday and check it out.

We are staying at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, which is a sight in itself, with its acres and acres of gardens and walkways. It's def…

The month of busyness - January in review


It never fails to surprise me how fast time flies. It seems like only yesterday I was planning my Christmas shopping, and now we are well into February. The start of the year is always a busy time for me. First I had to sync back to the east coast timings after my relaxing vacation in the Land of Hollywood. Then, I had to work up my motivation and inspiration to be able to work at full-steam. As someone once posted on Facebook, Monday mornings are always hard, but the Monday morning after a long vacation is nothing short of torture.

And then, there's all the challenge lists to make, if for nothing, but just to look at more book and blogs; read up everyone's plans and resolutions for the year, or why they don't intend to plan at all; create a lot of personal reading projects - resolve to do something or the other with the books languishing on one's shelves; and so on. All in all, January was a pretty busy month for me - I read less, I planned a lot - both made me happy, so that's fine. On top of it, I also participated in Bloggiesta, which left me satisfied but very brain-dead for a while. However, it wasn't until I typed up this post that I realized that I barely reviewed a book in January!

Books read this month
  1. Diary of a Wimpy Kid #2: Rodrick Rules by Jeff Kinney (Graphic Novels challenge)
  2. Diary of a Wimpy Kid #3: The Last Straw by Jeff Kinney (Graphic Novels challenge)
  3. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling
  4. Bel Canto by Ann Patchett (Orange Prize project)
  5. Left Neglected by Lisa Genova
  6. The Good Daughter: A Memoir of my Mother's Hidden Life by Jasmin Darznik (Middle East challenge)
  7. Someone Else's Garden by Dipika Rai
Notable books from the January reading list


Bel Canto and The Good Daughter - both WOW-worthy!

Reviews posted in January
  1. Room by Emma Donoghue
  2. Book n Movie review: Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane / Martin Scorsese
  3. Left Neglected by Lisa Genova
Other posts
  1. Plans for 2011
  2. Why I have trouble picking books randomly
  3. Bloggiesta
Traveling with my books this year


View Traveling with my books (2011) in a larger map

I'm thrilled that I managed to hit at least four continents in one month. And what's more - this foray into books set in other countries/continents feels very enjoyable, and not at all strange and uncertain.

Comments

bermudaonion (Kathy) said…
The older you get, the faster times flies by. It looks like you had a great month in books!
Juju at Tales of Whimsy... said…
What a cute idea. I love the map!

I tried Bel Canto. I couldn't get into it. Might be my current frame of mind. I've made a mental note to try it again later or try the audio.
ashbrux said…
I'm having some trouble adjusting to school, even though I'm going on my fourth week. I'm already looking forward to summer. Even if you didn't post a lot of reviews you still had a good reading month!
Athira / Aths said…
I would be terrified of rereading it too! It was such an amazing experience reading it the first time!

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