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Some 'firsts' in this new-normal world | Weekly Snapshot

I almost didn't make it here today! It's been an insanely busy week that's going to continue into today. Life This week has been a combination of busy at work and busy at home. The kids did not have school on Monday, which is also typically my busiest day at work. So when Monday ended, I felt as if I sucked at both life and work. The rest of the week was better - at least I was able to keep work and life separate.  This weekend just happens to be one of those when I have so much to do - thanks to the many tasks and chores deferred from previous days/weekends. We were getting quotes for some home improvement projects, had to start prepping rooms for my parents' arrival next month (mainly because I still haven't moved my daughter's online school materials out of the room from the Fall school year), and do lots of seasonal shopping. If it weren't going to be constantly raining this entire weekend, I would be prepping my garden beds as well, but now that needs t

Leif Reads: Slow Death by Rubber Duck


Leif Reads
Last month, Ash and I read Eaarth by Bill McKibben for Leif Reads. Eaarth looked at the current status quo in all things environmental from a holistic standpoint. Reading Eaarth gave us a more complete picture of how things stand and gave us a good idea of how we want to go forward. This month, we're reading Slow Death by Rubber Duck by Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie. This is a really interesting book. Remember pollution? Toxins? Asbestos? The big P -- Plastic?

For a long time, pollution was an external thing. It happened in the air, the water, some parts of the land. It happened near factories, and then from car exhausts too. We knew some part of it wasn't good to our health. There was all this hue and cry over pollution and how we needed cleaner air. Pollution now feels like last decade's hot news. I barely hear that word anymore. And rightly so. Rick and Bruce essay out a really wonderful case for how pollution effects have migrated from the outside to the inside of our body. How you can no longer see it (smog anyone?) but instead is very much invisible. How it's no longer localized to some place or object, but instead is everywhere. How it's no longer the big bad things causing it, but the small harmless everyday stuff, like rubber duck. And also how it used to cause sudden reactions once upon a time, but now just subsists forever bringing about the damages years and years later. Almost everything we do nowadays seems to have an effect generations from now.

Slow Death by Rubber Duck

Ash and I are really excited to talk about this book this month. In fact, Ash is doing this week's post over at her blog! Don't forget to check it out and share with us what you think!


Aths

Comments

hcmurdoch said…
This sounds depressing, but interesting. On NPR the other day I heard about a book called Moby Duck about a shipment of rubber duckies that was dumped at sea. The author joined the group that went looking for them and the book is all about trash in the ocean and ocean currents
Athira / Aths said…
I heard about that book recently and have it on my TBR. It's unbelievable the amount of apparently harmless stuff that is really harmful. I'm sure the ocean has far too much junk in it.
Misha said…
This seems like an important book for everyone. It's scary how some very harmless looking things turn out be dangerous.
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, it's so sad because we expect the manufacturers to make safe products for us. They don't, and they don't care. So a book like this makes things clearer and also makes us more of an active participant in ensuring safety.
Bibliophilebythesea said…
I'm glad you got to read this. I thought it was an eye opener.
Athira / Aths said…
I'm glad too that I read it!
Eva said…
This is going on my TBR list!
Athira / Aths said…
I'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts on this one!