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When you are LOST in a book | Weekly Snapshot

I have just spent a bulk of my past 24 waking hours racing through the book Big Little Lies. Gosh, it feels amazing to be so consumed by a book that all you want to do is read it at every small or big opportunity. It was hard putting the book down or not thinking about Madeline, Jane, Celeste, or their terribly convoluted lives when I was supposed to be doing something else.


Last Week We drove back from Nashville on Monday morning after two full fun days at the Gaylord resort and one morning at the Hermitage, President Jackson's house. The house itself was glorious (and huge!) - we all enjoyed a good amount of history that day. The resort was a feast for the eyes - all those trees and gardens inside the massive building!

On our drive back home, we had couple of hours to kill so we took the kids to the Dinosaur World in Kentucky. That turned out to be a good decision as the kids had a blast and the adults also had fun learning something new.

Currently This weekend is so far turning…

Yet another Monday! (Oct 24, 2011)


It's Monday! What are you reading this week?

Sheila @ One Persons Journey through a world of Books wants to know what we're reading. I'm only too happy to oblige!

We're almost at the end of October, and I'm scrambling to try and get more reads in before the end of the year. A funk had better stay clear of me now.

Books finished since the last update
-  Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
-  A Thousand Lives by Julia Scheeres
-  Happy Accidents: My Gleeful Life by Jane Lynch

News from over my blog

Reviews up!
-   Goliath (Leviathan, #3) by Scott Westerfeld
-   Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk and Naked by David Sedaris
-   Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami

Other posts
-  Shelving a read book (and fretting about it)
-  Blogger Recommends (September Finds)

Books on my nightstand
I have two wonderful books in my pile whose subject matter is strange and unique, in addition to another book that I'm reading during my lunch hours.

The Wasp FactoryThe Wasp Factory by Iain Banks: This very graphic book from the head of a boy who has killed three people and enjoys torturing animals is very strange, and yet hard to put down. I'm glad it's a slim book, I wonder how much more venom the rest of the book packs.
Repeat It Today With TearsRepeat It Today With Tears by Anne Peile: When this book was longlisted for the Orange Prize this year, it raised quite a few eyebrows with its theme. Having been abandoned by her father when she was a child, Susanna conceals her identity and begins an illicit affair with her father. So far, I'm "enjoying" the read - I haven't yet arrived at any disturbing sections.
FrankensteinFrankenstein by Mary Shelley: Considering that I'm reading this book as a spooky October read, I'm hoping to finish it sooner, since Halloween's almost here. I'm only one-third of my way in and some of the 19th century writing is fascinating, but truthfully, I'm glad we are past all that formality even within the same families.










Comments

Juju at Tales of Whimsy.com said…
Frankenstein? I keep meaning to read that. Enjoy. Perfect seasonal read.
Holy $hit, Repeat it Today with Tears sounds amazingly disturbing, definitely look forward to your review.  Wow
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks! It is a wonderful read.
Athira / Aths said…
It does, doesn't it? I'm loving it so far.
Sheila (Book Journey) said…
I want to read A Thousand Lives and Happy Accidents!
christa @ mental foodie said…
I was going to say what Marce said, so I won't repeat :)
Hmm Repeat it With Tears is certainly a unique premise. I have some of David Sedaris's titles but I haven't got to them yet - off to read your review of squirrels

Shelleyrae @ book'd Out
Vicki said…
David Sedaris is hilarious!
Here's Mine
Karen Sime said…
I loved Kafka On The Shore. Not all Murakami fans can agree on that one but I loved it. Glad you liked it too. Just read your review and your right, magical realism is the norm for Murakami. Norwegian Wood is probably his most 'real life' book if you want to read something other than magical realism. In fact a lot of people believe it is semi-autobiographical although Murakami denies it. Fantastic book though.

Read the Wasp Factory years ago. It's the only Banks book that I have been able to finish. Feel bad as the author is a fellow Scot but I just can't take to his writing. Loved Frankenstein. 
Pussreboots said…
I still want to read Kafka on the Shore. I had a busy week of reading. My goodness. I'm shocked at how many I finished. Come see what I read.
Young1 said…
What a lovely list you have worked your way through in the past week and it looks like you will have another interesting week ahead! 
How have you been?!
epkwrsmith said…
I'll be interested to see your final opinion on both The Wasp Factory and Repeat it Today with Tears...the subject matter alone would keep me from both.  
Frankenstein is one of my favorites!  So different from the general perception of the story due to the whole green monster with the square head idea in everyone's mind...this book is about so much more.  I need to re-read this one.
Sally Sapphire said…
I've had The Wasp Factory sitting on my shelf for far too long now - I'll be interested to see what you think of it.
Athira / Aths said…
I enjoyed both, so I hope you get to read them.
Athira / Aths said…
Ha ha! I can't wait to read the rest of it.
Athira / Aths said…
I enjoyed the two Sedaris titles I listened to, so I can't wait to read more of his books.
Athira / Aths said…
He certainly is! I'm glad I finally gave him a try.
Athira / Aths said…
I'm looking forward to reading Norwegian Wood next. I've heard many recommend it as his best work.
Athira / Aths said…
I hope you get to read Kafka on the Shore.
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks! I'm great, how have you been?? It's been a while since I chatted with you. I hope you are having a good time.
Athira / Aths said…
I'm most impressed with frankenstein because of how the book differs big time from the general perception we have of that "green monster with the square head". Can't wait to finish it.
Athira / Aths said…
It's really good, so far. I can't wait to review it.
Helen Murdoch said…
Repeat it today with tears sounds just too creepy for me! And I am keeping Wasp Factory on my "close to me" TBR pile so that it gets read in the next few weeks.
Jackie said…
Will definitely be adding Repeat It Today With Tears to my TBR list.

Here's my http://junkboattravels.blogspot.com/2011/10/its-monday-what-are-you-reading_24.html
Jackie said…
P.S. I'm following you!!!
Ooh, A Thousand Lives is on my list!  Enjoy all of your books!

Here's

http://laurelrainsnow.wordpress.com/2011/10/23/monday-from-the-interior-mailbox-monday-what-are-you-reading-oct-24/
Fantastic list of books to be read this week!! Frankenstein, very October-ish read :) Halloween coming up and all, lol. I will be looking forward to your review of Goliath; I haven't gotten around to reading that specific series by Scott Westerfield, I am going to be starting his other one "Uglies". 

Happy Reading this week! :) New Follower!
zibilee said…
I also got Repeat It Today With Tears, and I have to say that I am intrigued by it. It sounds like it's going to be an amazing read. I really want to read The Wasp Factory as well, and will be waiting to see what you think of it before I go out and get it. Great reads for this week! I am just getting started with The Lady of the Rivers by Gregory, and am hoping to also get to In the Fabled East and Unbroken this week as well. Wish me luck!
nomadreader said…
I really enjoyed Repeat It Today with Tears. Hope you keep liking it!
Ellie Warren said…
I am going to have to go check out you Squirrel Meets Chipmunk review now!

http://curiositykilledthebookworm.blogspot.com/
You are doing some heavy reading.  I'll be watching for your review of The Wasp Factory.
Athira / Aths said…
So far, I like Repeat it Today with Tears, but I haven't landed on taboo grounds yet, so let's see.
Athira / Aths said…
Yay! I hope you like it.
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks! I hope you have a good week too!
Athira / Aths said…
Goliath was really good. The link on this post will take you to my review. I liked Uglies, I hope you enjoy the series.
Athira / Aths said…
Wow, you are going to have an incredible week! I can't wait to hear what you think of Unbroken!
Athira / Aths said…
So far, I like it. I can't wait to see where this goes!
Athira / Aths said…
I'm about a quarter of my way in and can't wait to finish it!
I sometimes have a hard time reading some of the classics due to the formality too.  I enjoy them, but I'm often glad when I finish them.  Hope you have a great week :)
I've never heard of The Wasp Factory before. I can't wait to read your review of this. The book sounds just a little strange. Happy reading.
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks! I agree language is the biggest challenge with classics. Still, I hope to read them sometime.
Athira / Aths said…
It is. I'm halfway in, and I'm curious about what's wrong with this kid!
Jackie said…
Thanks for dropping by. I'm sure you'd enjoy Chalcot Crescent.
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks! I'm glad to hear that! 

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