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Recently Discovered Books

Like most of us (definitely not all because some of you sure have some super efficient TBR systems), I collect book recommendation after another until one day I realize I'm never getting through this list in my lifetime, so I decide to burrow my head in the sand rather than deal with it. This week, however, I unintentionally chanced upon that list and got sucked into a rabbit hole of looking up many of the recently discovered books - some that I had read about only once but they still sounded amazing. Since good things are best shared, I'm listing some of the most amazing books I came across recently and hope to read in this lifetime, though sooner is preferable, of course.



The Psychology of Time Travel, Kate Mascarenhas Do you remember those good old days when everyone was gushing about The Time Traveler's Wife? Goodness, I feel so much older just thinking about how long it has been since I read that book. I need to reread it just for the nostalgia. The time travel aspect…

The Sunday Salon: Post Hunger Games mania


The Sunday 
Salon.com

Hello Sunday Saloners! After months of teasing, The Hunger Games movie finally arrived at the screens. Did any of you get to watch it yet? The husband and I went for the Friday night premiere, and watched it with hordes of teens and a few adults here and there. I guess I was more excited at this premiere than I was at the premiere of the last Harry Potter movie, because understandably this is just the beginning of a new franchise, whereas the eighth Harry Potter movie was the setting to say the final goodbye!

The Hunger Games movie was so much better than I expected it to be. It was a good thing that I had read the book about 3 years ago and not in the recent past. From experience, I know that can ruin the movie for me, because I am such a stickler for details and I hate to see something from the book missing or some details changed. So, when I walked into the theater, only the main essence of the book and its pivotal elements were what I was looking for.

I was glad that the director stayed (mostly) true to the book. Yeah, he did do some of that artistic license thing that tends to bug me - I sensed a few changes, a few additions, a few sore missing points. But I have to admit that the movie Katniss was much less grating that the book Katniss, probably because we are not in her head. I'm curious to see how they'll address that in the third movie though. I did however love that the movie shows some of the extra stuff - how Haymitch manages to find sponsors for Katniss, what is happening with President Snow while the Games are on, and what Gale's been doing and thinking.

Now I want to reread the books again!

Speaking of reading, I've had a great week of that. I finished three books, a short story, a graphic true crime and am going through two other books right now. Sure, I'm behind on a lot of other things (there's always something to pay, I guess), but it's nice to be reading a lot for a change.


Comments

Jenn said…
I wrote about HG today, too. The movie was really powerful to me, and I just cannot get it out of my head. Usually hype annoys me, but today I'm glad everyone is talking about it.

To be perfectly honest, I think it's one of the best book-to-movie adaptations I've ever seen. In terms of artistic license, I think if anything, the director interpreted the books wholly as opposed to just sticking with what happened in the books. Normally yes, that would bug me, but I thought this film was completely effective.

So glad you enjoyed it, too!
pattismith said…
Glad to hear Hollywood decided to stick as close to the story as possible...I was hopeful after they chose an unknown actress for the lead.  I'm not done with the trilogy yet, so it will be a little longer before I see the movie.  
I'll tell my husband about thoughts on the movie, which he thinks is for YA viewers only. I'd like to see it so we might go after all.
Kathy said…
I just finished the book so I can see the movie with my husband.  I have a feeling I'll be nitpicking it since the book is fresh in my mind.
Kim Ukura said…
I felt exactly the same way about the movie. I liked it a lot, was glad I hadn't recently read the book, and now I want to read the books over again!
Helen Murdoch said…
I am seeing the movie tomorrow and am so excited! I am also glad that I haven't read the books recently as I get mad when they change details. This way, like you, I don't remember it well enough to be bothered by it
Athira / Aths said…
I'm with you on one of the best book-to-movie adaptations! I put this one up there with the LOTR movies! I wasn't bothered with any of the changes between the books and the movie - I noticed them, that's all. Usually they bother me, but this time, I noticed them and left it at that. I can't wait to see the movie again!
Athira / Aths said…
They definitely did the movie really well. You should finish the series, then watch the movie. It's definitely a worthwhile experience!
Athira / Aths said…
I totally don't think this is for YA only. It is marketed mainly for them, but the messages and timeless. And the acting is superb - so you won't feel that you're watching cheesy YA stuff. I think you should go watch it!
Athira / Aths said…
Kathy, what did you think of the book? I'm eager to hear how you found it. 
Athira / Aths said…
I'm wondering if I can squeeze in these reads during lunch at work. Watching the movie has made me more appreciative of the books!
Athira / Aths said…
I can't wait to hear what you think of the movie! I'm sure you will enjoy it! Having read it long ago definitely helps!
Marg Bates said…
I posted about The Hunger Games for my Sunday Salon post this week too.

Overall, I thought they did a pretty good adaptation of the books - certainly kept true to the feel of the books. The things they added were good - especially the things that you mentioned like Haymitch schmoozing with the sponsors and the control room. Yes, there were some things missing and I would still highly recommend the books as a starting point. I am glad that I hadn't read the books too recently though.
Christina T said…
I didn't reread the book before watching the movie either. I made that mistake before with the Harry Potter books and then when I saw the movie, I kept thinking about the changes instead of enjoying the movie! I think they did a really good job with adapting it. The additions were mostly good and I think helped explain things to those who haven't read the books.
c b said…
I can't wait to see this!!! christa @ mental foodie
Judith said…
Glad you enjoyed the movie. I hope to see it soon. For me, it's also been a while since I read the book. As my memory isn't that strong about the story, I will be able to watch it without knowing what's coming (except for the broad storyline of course). I'm looking forward to it!
Ti said…
As you know, I have not seen it yet. I read the books when they first came out, so I am a bit distanced from it too. I really want to see it, but I DETEST crowds. I will be hitting the desert for Spring Break soon. I might try and see it there. Retirement community, fewer teens, etc. 
Juju at Tales of Whimsy.com said…
OMG me too! I loved it and can seem to start another regular book because my heart is craving HG.

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