Skip to main content

The Sunday Salon: Some reading and some petting


The Sunday 
Salon.com

It's been ages since I did the last Salon post and I feel pretty clueless around here for a change. I've been up since two hours ago and the hour hand is only just slowly making its way to the 8 o'clock mark. Dogs and their early morning urges! It's been two weeks since we got Rue, and it's been a lot of revelations, learnings, changes, fun, and anxiety since then. The first week was all lovey-dovey. We loved the dog, she loved us. It was all a big happy family. We were pretty relieved that Rue was turning out to be low maintenance. As with things like these, once the honeymoon ended, the nightmares started. One day I came home to see that she had pretty much upended the recycle bin and started chewing on bottles and cans and strewn the litter in the hall. The neatofreak in me had a terrible panic attack. That same evening she ran out of the house (to do her business) but she didn't return back when I called her. Anyways, the point is, we found she has separation anxiety and I have seen pretty much all the symptoms in her - she follows me around all the time, she hates sitting alone, she jumps over-excitedly when I return from work, she chews crazily, she barks madly, etc. Did I really say low maintenance?

Still, she's already become such a core part of our home that I don't remember much about how things "used to be". I'm just hoping that we can get her to reduce her barking (I sit terrified every day that some neighbor will go and complain. *fingers crossed*) Right now, she barks at every Tom, Dick, Mary and their dog. Drives me mad!

Dog tales aside, my reading is slowly picking up. Or rather, I'm making it pick up. I doubt I'll ever get back to the 'plenty of time to read and blog' kind-of life, so I might as well make the time to do either when I can, which means warming up more to ebooks. Audiobooks have never worked for me, so I doubt I'll rush over to pick them. I'd rather spend my eyes-occupied time listening to podcasts or Lady Antebellum. Last night, I finished the first book of Patrick Ness' wildly popular Chaos Trilogy series - The Knife of Never Letting Go, which has left me with mixed feelings. I plan to read the next book in the series sometime later, after I'm done with the other two reads I started yesterday - Make It Stay for a book tour and Neal Shusterman's Unwind for serendipity. Both are going great, although I'm able to get through the former only in sprints.

At the moment, I'm looking forward to a lazy Sunday and plenty of reading, and some barking frenzy during Rue's training class that we have today.

Comments

bermudaonion (Kathy) said…
I was gone a couple weeks ago and missed that you got Rue! I clicked over and she's a doll! I'm sure she'll settle down soon.
Jill Broderick said…
I love hearing your Rue stories so I can get a dog and go through all the stages vicariously, since we can't get one! I'm sure she will settle down eventually!
Juju at Tales of Whimsy.com said…
Awwwww I remember those days.
I think it takes months to really cement the dog/owner relationship and for the dog to get into the groove of what is expected of him or her.
Hang in there.
:)
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, we figured her few weeks at the shelter frightened her. She should settle down in a bit.
Athira / Aths said…
We didn't think we'd get a dog this soon either. I am trying to keep Rue stories at a minimum on the blog, but it's hard. :) So I'm glad that you are looking forward to them.
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, I guess we'll just wait it out until she settles down with us. But she's doing great at home, so that's nice.
Bellezza said…
Hope you had more reading than barking at the end of the day; still we live our pets, don't we?! Have a good week!
Helen Murdoch said…
Ah dogs... love and wish they'd go away since they are so much work. Truthfully, I would be heartbroken if our dog (Charlie) was gone. But, each day I resent having to be home around a certain time to walk and feed him. Luckily, he was never a chewer!
Veens said…
What a cute name..Rue :) We have one at my mom's place and well she hasn't changed and I think with time she has become the dominating figure around there :D I haven't read any of the books you mention but I have the heard of the 1st one :) I hope to read your review and decide on all of them.
Athira / Aths said…
We did have plenty of barking, but I got some good reading done too. But sigh, we do love our pets too much.
Athira / Aths said…
You said that right. I am beginning to get annoyed that I have to be home by a certain time to walk Rue. I am waiting for the days when she can sit in the house without whining or getting destructive. Sigh, we'll get there.
Athira / Aths said…
Haha, we let Rue have the run of the house initially, but with the few things that happened last week, we've taken the 180 degree turn.
Tina Reed said…
I really think crate training helps with that. It makes them feel safe. It's hard at first, but after a few days, they really begin to like the crate. Then when they are out, they do their business and the routine helps them feel confident. if you do it, Google it and do not put potty pads are food in there just water. You want her to learn to hold it.
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks for the suggestions. We started crating her after the littering incident, and she's been going to the crate (sometimes) on her own. I feel so much better leaving her alone now, and I'm beginning to feel she likes it too. Luckily, she is very well housetrained, so as long as I stay to her schedule, she does her business outside. Water's the thing I'm not so sure about. I want to leave a little of that inside, but I worry she may choose to play in it, as she once did when we were outside.

Popular posts from this blog

Hell-Heaven by Jhumpa Lahiri (Short Fiction Review)

I first read Jhumpa Lahiri years ago, when her Interpreter of Maladies was making a huge buzz. At the time, I didn't catch any of the buzz, but for some reason, when I saw the book on the shelf at the store I was browsing in, I felt it just might be a decent read. Funnily, I read the entire short story collection without complaining about it, but for some reason, I cannot read any collection anymore without agonizing over its disjoint nature.

I did enjoy Interpreter of Maladies, but I did get bothered by the thread of loneliness and infidelity and distrust that laced through the stories. For that reason, I have been reluctant to read Unaccustomed Earth. However, when I came across Hell-Heaven at the NewYorker - a free short story from her book, I decided to go ahead and read it. I can't resist the pull of stories set in India or featuring Indian characters, and it is that same aspect that hooked me throughout this story.


In Hell-Heaven, the narrator contemplates the relations…

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Maybe that’s what religion is, hurling yourself off a cliff and trusting that something bigger will take care of you and carry you to the right place.
Bernadette Fox has a reputation. While her husband and her daughter Bee love her, there's barely anyone else who share the sentiment. Her neighbor Audrey loves to gossip mean things about her with her close friend, Soo-Lin. The other parents of kids at Bee's school look down on Bernadette because she doesn't involve herself in school affairs. Bernadette herself goes out of her way to avoid company.

And then one day, Bee comes home with an excellent report card and asks for her reward - a family trip to Antarctica. The very plan throws Bernadette into a panic but she has no other option. She hires a virtual assistant, based out of India to take care of all her demands, including getting prescriptions at her local pharmacy, doing her online shopping and taking care of some of the logistics of her trip. (It is ridiculous! Bern…

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson (Short Fiction review)

With the Hunger Games hype that engulfed us last week, it was hard to avoid all the discussion of similar works that existed. Of the many titles that I came across, two stood out particularly - a short story called The Lottery and a Japanese novel (and movie) called Battle Royale (which I'm reading right now and just cannot put down). The novel will be fodder for another post, so for now, I just want to rave about the awesomeness that was The Lottery.

In contemporary America, villagers across the country are gathering on the 27th of June (and some a day earlier) for an annual event called the Lottery. Children, women, men, all come to the main square of their village or town, where the lottery master keeps a black box full of paper chips. One of these chips is marked has a special mark on it to identify the winner (the person who draws that chip). Not everyone draws however, but only the head of the family. Husbands are viewed as the head of their families/households, and if the …