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A New Way of Living | Weekly Snapshot

I don't know about you guys but this has been one of the longest weeks ever. With schools closed and work moved to home, this has been a new way of living. When the changes and shutdowns came just before last weekend, there was no time to really process the information. Within days, life had changed. And then on Monday, I reported to work, from my home, with kids also at home. It was when Friday finally rolled along that I felt the gravity of the situation, how we'll be rarely getting out for weeks, if not for months. How schools were likely going to be closed for months. How work still had to be done remotely or worse, there was no work to do anymore due to layoffs or a shutdown. How there was not going to be any dining in restaurants for months.


That was a very sobering thought. I didn't sleep until 1.30am that night.

How are you all doing? What are some of your tips to keep your sanity on while we get through this very difficult time? Some of you are in places that are …

Should I read....


This book?



Because, obviously, this is coming later this year...


I prefer reading a book before watching its movie equivalent, unless the book doesn't lure me one bit (like One Day) or the movie/TV equivalent sounds like the better way to experience the story (eg: Vampire Diaries, and I don't like vampires anyways) or the humongous size of the book just keeps giving me shivers (Hello, Game of Thrones). And sometimes, the book happens to belong to a period I struggle with (Pride and Prejudice). But I still much prefer to read a book first, because books are better, right?

Somehow, I'm not sure about The Great Gatsby though. The reviews I've read have made me alternately intrigued and indifferent. But since Leonardo DiCaprio is in it, it's a given that I'll be sitting in the movie theater, probably during the first week after release itself.

What do you think? Have you read it? Planning to? Or not your soup?


Comments

Ti said…
Yes! Read it!
Jaime Shetrone said…
Read it! It's a pretty easy read, one of the easier classics, in my opinion.
neal call said…
Yeah, it's a quick read, why not? Although you could really make it a challenging and psychedelic experience by adding a completely inappropriate soundtrack. I read it in highschool while listening to Eiffel 65's "Blue" on repeat (I just liked the song, back off), and now I can't think of the book without Europop echoing faintly in the back of my head. It's kind of spooky.
Jenn said…
I haven't read it in years, but I remember enjoying it. Of course, I've gone back and read some of my favorites from when I was younger and been disappointed. There are several readalongs of this happening in the fall, so maybe look into that? I've found with a classic I've been hesitant of, I'm much more likely to pick it up if there's the chance of discussion.
Alyce said…
I haven't read it in years, but it was one of the few classics I read in high school that I really liked. I should read it again as an adult to refresh my memory and see if my opinion has changed any.
Helen Murdoch said…
I read Great Gatsby in high school so it's been a while, I remember liking it, but not loving it. Perhaps as an adult I'd feel differently. I think you should read it before seeing the movie
bermudaonion (Kathy) said…
I read it in high school and definitely think you should read it if you haven't before.
softdrink said…
It's not one of my favorites, but I didn't hate it, either. I think it's definitely worth reading.
pburt said…
I read in high school and college and will try to read it again before seeing the movie. It is a quick read so I would definitely try - but then, like you, I like to read books before the movie. 
JoV said…
I have read it. Nothing to shout about but I would be interested in the adaptation. It would be worth for you reading the book and then watch the movie. After all it is really a wafer thin book! :)
Athira / Aths said…
That's wonderful to hear! I was worried it might take a while to get through.
Athira / Aths said…
Haha! That cracked me up! Now I need to do something wild like that - I'm pretty sure I wouldn't forget the book or the song ever!
Athira / Aths said…
Oh, readalongs sound good. I did see many others reading this book, which is partly why I'm really curious. I guess I will check it out.
Athira / Aths said…
That's wonderful! I don't know too many classics that I read in school and still like. I will pick this one up.
Athira / Aths said…
I somehow missed it in school, but I've heard about it for a long time. It's high time I picked it up to read.
Athira / Aths said…
I am curious to check it out now. Didn't expect so many of you to vote yes. 
Athira / Aths said…
That's good to hear. I don't know how it will fare with me, but so long as it is worth the time, I am all for it. 
Athira / Aths said…
I'm happy hearing that it is a quick read. For some reason, I was imagining it to be a slow book. 
Athira / Aths said…
Have to say I am surprised that this book is really slim! I somehow imagined a bigger slower book. Have to read it now!
Kim Ukura said…
I'm going to read it soon. I read it in high school and didn't like it, at all, but I feel like that was high school and not necessarily the book. I want to try and reread it as an adult with fresh eyes.
Jenny said…
I think you should! It's short enough that even if you don't love it you'll get through it quickly.
Athira / Aths said…
It's awesome that you are rereading! I'm hoping to check it out sometime in Fall!
Athira / Aths said…
That's the best part I guess - its length. I'm really looking forward to reading it.
Marg Bates said…
I read it earlier this year (kind of) in anticipation of the movie coming out later and thoroughly enjoyed it, so I would go with read it!
Young_1 said…
I have been wanting to read this for a while now - i definitely did not know this was coming out but gives me a reason to read! I want to read the Bell Jar too! 
I bought the audio and plan to listen to it a few weeks before seeing the movie. So great minds think alike. ;)

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