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Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn


Gone Girl
There’s something disturbing about recalling a warm memory and feeling utterly cold.

On his fifth wedding anniversary, while Nick wonders thoughtfully about the state of his marriage with Amy, his wife disappears. There are signs of violence in his house, causing all fingers to point to Nick. Nick's own thoughts aren't guilt-free either. Alternating chapters with Nick's narration, Amy's diary reveals her side of the marriage up until that day. She isn't the easiest of persons to be around with, but her story indicates a marriage expectation gone sour. And then came Part 2 of the book.

Like everyone else on Bloglandia, I'll have to not reveal any spoilers here. Most likely, you have already read this book. If not, you are probably planning to read it. Around the time this book started making waves, I was following bookish news on and off, mostly off. It seemed like suddenly this book rose up to the top of many must-read lists. Even then, I wasn't really that fascinated by it, until I read Jill's two-word review. While I didn't feel that astounded - maybe because of the hype and my insane expectations, I did end up feeling pretty close.

I'm reading a thriller after a really long time. I usually stay away from that genre, because they mostly disappoint me owing to their repetitive nature, but it's refreshing to see books like these once in a while. While I enjoyed reading the plenty of twists in this book, I found the one at the conclusion relatively lame (though fitting).

I didn't like either Nick or Amy, although like many other readers, my loyalties kept jumping between the two all through the book. I guess when the truths eventually toppled out is when I started losing my respect. But that doesn't mean they were badly characterized - they were actually rather strong vivid ones that will leave you with an opinion either way. Both Nick and Amy were very damaged. Their supporting cast also consisted of plenty of eccentric characters that seemed to be jostling for the most-weird-character-on-book prize. They certainly helped add to the atmosphere of craziness that was the norm in this book.

The Husband also read the book with me, but I think he was drastically affected by the evilness of one of the characters (just kidding). He also enjoyed the book but for the ending. Gone Girl is my first read by this author, and I was quite thrilled to read that Gillian Flynn has two other books out as well. I found her writing in Gone Girl quite lyrical and captivating, the kind I rarely see in thrillers, though I have read a few such.


I received this ebook from a good friend of mine.


Comments

bermudaonion(Kathy) said…
I'm just going to have to drop everything and pick this one up soon. I've got to know what everyone else is talking about.
I keep thinking this one isn't for me. But I did love your review. And your husband's perspective.

Ha! Jill's review is FUNN-Y! :)
Alyce said…
I still haven't been convinced that I need to read this book, despite all of the hype (or maybe because of it). I'm not a huge fan of thrillers, and I really have to be in the right mood to read one. But, the fact that everyone in the whole wide world seems to think it's the bees knees... well that has to count for something I guess. So I haven't ruled it out.
Lisa said…
I was pretty sure I was going to read this one before I read Jill's review but that was definitely the one that cinched it. And it was maybe one of the best review's I've ever read. I need to get to this one soon.
Tina Reed said…
I enjoyed the entertainment aspect but thought the plot was ridiculous.
Laurel-Rain Snow said…
Yes, I would agree that Gone Girl had some really unlikeable characters...and yes, my loyalties kept switching. Then I was blown away.

Afterwards, I knew I had to read more from this author, so I just finished Sharp Objects. Twisted in a different way.

Loved them both!
christa @ mental foodie said…
I keep hearing how good this one is! I am so behind on all my book news/reading... sigh.

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