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Recently Discovered Books

Like most of us (definitely not all because some of you sure have some super efficient TBR systems), I collect book recommendation after another until one day I realize I'm never getting through this list in my lifetime, so I decide to burrow my head in the sand rather than deal with it. This week, however, I unintentionally chanced upon that list and got sucked into a rabbit hole of looking up many of the recently discovered books - some that I had read about only once but they still sounded amazing. Since good things are best shared, I'm listing some of the most amazing books I came across recently and hope to read in this lifetime, though sooner is preferable, of course.



The Psychology of Time Travel, Kate Mascarenhas Do you remember those good old days when everyone was gushing about The Time Traveler's Wife? Goodness, I feel so much older just thinking about how long it has been since I read that book. I need to reread it just for the nostalgia. The time travel aspect…

Snapshots from a long break


After a long road trip that involved driving for more than 1700 miles, it is wonderful to be home finally. We started at Raleigh and went all the way to the Niagara Falls before returning. There was a lot of driving in two cars which was tiring (our parents and the husband's brother were also with us) and the husband had to work from home during some of the days (boo!) but it was still a fun trip with no drama this time.

View from the 86th floor of the Empire State Building. We did go up to the
102nd floor as well, but honestly, there wasn't much difference.

We headed first to Raleigh, where two of our buddies stay. We spent the wet weekend leisurely, playing bowling and mini golf and eating great food. On Monday was the husband's brother's convocation in Winston-Salem. We drove to New York next after spending the night at our home, to attend my brother's convocation. That evening, we hung around Times Square, visiting Madame Tussauds, the Empire State Building and the 911 memorial. Madame Tussauds was an anticlimax, mainly because I knew so much about the wax works that the artifacts didn't impress me too much when I finally saw them. The memorial, however, was simply breathtaking, with the two pools appropriately majestic and profound. The names of all who lost their lives that day were etched along the border of the pools. It was very moving being at the site of the attacks and I thought the memorial paid a proper tribute to those who died that day.

The North and South pools at the 911 memorial site.

We then spent the last leg of our vacation in Niagara Falls, which I was visiting for the first time and the husband for the second time. The Falls were also overwhelmingly beautiful and even that's an understatement. We took the boat ride to the center of the Falls and that was an amazing experience - to be so close to the Falls. I'm glad that I can cross that out of my bucket list.

Niagara falls

The parents are leaving for India today, after a nice long stay with us. It's going to be really quiet around here now - our dog is definitely going to miss them. On the plus side, I will hopefully get more reading time.

Comments

kai charles said…
Gorgeous pictures! Hope you get time to read again soon :)
zibilee said…
Oh, man, it looks like you had a most amazing trip! I love the pics that you provided, and am so glad that you got to have that experience! Glad you are back!
Great pictures. I love NF. :) You should do the heli ride one day. It was amazing.
Jenn said…
What a great trip! Thanks for sharing.
Helen Murdoch said…
It sounds like you had a wonderful time on your vacation! I've never been to Niagra Falls, it looks fantastic. The 9/11 memorial looks great, when I went years ago it was nothing and disappointing.
Athira / Aths said…
Glad to be back too! The trip was definitely fun.
Athira / Aths said…
We didn't stay too long in Niagara but I hope to go back some day and even cross over to Canada. I should plan to do the heli ride too.
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, I believe they opened the memorial two-three years ago only. There is still a lot of construction happening all around - someday that place will be able to settle down.
Kim Ukura said…
Your trip looks wonderful! I've wanted to go to the 9/11 memorial the last couple of years, but it never seems to work out. Hopefully I will get to see it the next time I'm in New York, it looks lovely.
JoV said…
Thanks for sharing the pictures. I hope to visit Big Apple one day. Glad you had fun!
Athira / Aths said…
It's a beautiful though somber place to visit. There is still a lot of construction happening in that area. I hope you will get a chance to visit.
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