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Waltzing in the Music City | Weekly Snapshot

If you're in the US, do you have Monday off from work or school, to observe President's Day? All of us at our home do, which is lucky because this isn't a day that every company or institution observes with a day off. Even though it's not been too long since the Christmas and New Year holiday season, I'd been pining for a vacation for a while - something either low-key or relaxing that even the kids will enjoy.


Currently This post is coming to you from the Music City - Nashville - where we are spending the long weekend. We are technically here only for two days and will leave early on Monday so that we are home in time to pick our dog from boarding. Although I don't personally care much for the music scene other than to listen to what's popular on the radio, I had been hoping to stop by Nashville someday and check it out.

We are staying at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, which is a sight in itself, with its acres and acres of gardens and walkways. It's def…

Light Reading and Quick Thoughts: Drama by Raina Telgemeier


(Photo credit)
In 2011, I read almost 20 graphic books. However, since then, I've read only four - Drama included. I'm not sure why I didn't seek out enough graphic books lately, maybe I got worn out by the format and needed a break. When I saw Drama at the library this week, it was hard to ignore it. It has exactly the style of illustrations I love - it makes you think that you're going to have fun with the book. Moreover, having read a few reviews of this book in other blogs, I knew it comes with strong recommendations.

In Drama, seventh-grader Callie is part of the stage crew that designs sets, costumes, lighting effects and props, among other things. She has had a long fascination with drama and theater, having even auditioned once for a role  (she sucked as a singer). Before long, she found out that designing sets is what she loves to do. In this book, the stage crew decides to put up "Moon over Mississippi" and they begin auditions. Between planning for the show and her struggling non-existent love life, Callie was going to have a very difficult year at school.

Drama

If you haven't read Drama, you should be heading now over to your library or bookstore and grabbing it from the shelf. If someone else is holding the library/store's only copy of the book, feel free to nudge and bug that person until you can get hold of it. Drama was a very refreshing quick read. I enjoyed it so much that I wanted to read it again. Poor Callie is falling in love with all the wrong/unavailable guys. And there is one guy trying hard and rudely to get her to notice him. Luckily for her, she has stage work to distract her. Being in charge of set design, she has been very effusive about her ideas for this year's drama, including using a real cannon as a prop. Of course, that isn't accepted, but there's still a cannon and oh boy, poor Callie just doesn't seem to be able to get that to work. It was delightful reading how she treads through her seventh grade with all these problems over her head.

Comments

bermudaonion(Kathy) said…
I really liked that book too. I want to read the author's other graphic novel now - I think it's called Smile.
Sam_TinyLibrary said…
I'm just starting to get into graphic novels, so I appreciate the recommendation if this one :)
Jennifer Hartling said…
Drama sounds wonderful! I'm always on the hunt for a new GN. I recently started reading them.
Vasilly said…
Drama is such a good book! My daughter and I devoured it. I just wish the author wrote a tad faster. ;-) Glad you enjoyed it too.
I've heard such great things about Raina Telgemeier, both this book and Smile. I guess it's time to pick them up!
Shweta said…
Drama has been on my wishlist for a while now. All it took me to add it to my wishlist was that super cute cover! :) Glad to know its a delightful book.

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