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What's Reading this Week! (Sep 30, 2013)

Well, well, well... Looks like we only have three more months left in the year. It always bugs me how it feels like only yesterday we finished with all the Halloween/Thanksgiving/Christmas celebrations, and what do you know, they are already just around the corner. Quite frightening, really. 

The Complete MausI had a really slow week in reading - it had to happen sometime. I think the problem was that I was reading The Silent Wife very slowly. It's a great book, really, but it's also a book I would read in a couple of sittings and not a few pages at a time. So it's back on the shelf for now, but I'm hoping to get back to it soon. In the meantime, I started rereading Maus. Last time I read it (sometime last year), I couldn't bring myself to review it. The book was so much more than I could really say anything about it. While rereading it now, I've been feeling that I may have read it too fast the first time - there are a lot of things I don't recollect reading. I'm hoping to be able to review it this time.

Next in the list
MetaMausI'm also reading Monsters of Men on and off. The Chaos Walking series was interesting when I first started reading it but now it feels a little dragging. Still, it's a good read. After this, I plan to read MetaMaus, which is sort of a how-Maus-came-into-being book. I've been eyeing it for a while, ever since the husband gifted it to me last year along with the Maus book.

Reviews posted
1. Attachments by Rainbow Rowell (Ooh-la-la!)

Review Backlog
1. Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish by David Rakoff
2. Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
3. Can you Keep a Secret? by Sophie Kinsella
4. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick
5. In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
6. The Boy Who Could See Demons by Carolyn Jess-Cooke
7. The Baby-Sitters Club graphic series by Raina Telgemeier

Comments

Oh, I'm really curious what you'll think of MetaMaus! I've never read that one. I bet it will be really interesting, especially after re-reading Maus. Hope you have a great week!
Vasilly said…
Maus has been in my tbr pile for a ridiculous amount of time. This year is flying by! There's still so much that I want to do.
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