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Waltzing in the Music City | Weekly Snapshot

If you're in the US, do you have Monday off from work or school, to observe President's Day? All of us at our home do, which is lucky because this isn't a day that every company or institution observes with a day off. Even though it's not been too long since the Christmas and New Year holiday season, I'd been pining for a vacation for a while - something either low-key or relaxing that even the kids will enjoy.


Currently This post is coming to you from the Music City - Nashville - where we are spending the long weekend. We are technically here only for two days and will leave early on Monday so that we are home in time to pick our dog from boarding. Although I don't personally care much for the music scene other than to listen to what's popular on the radio, I had been hoping to stop by Nashville someday and check it out.

We are staying at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, which is a sight in itself, with its acres and acres of gardens and walkways. It's def…

The Sunday Salon: On a non-book related note!

The Sunday 
Salon.com

Good morning, Sunday Saloners! It's been a month since I last posted a Sunday Salon, but mostly, it's also been a pretty slow month on the blog. Most times when the going gets slow over here, the reading also barely gets anywhere. Luckily for me, I've been reading quite a lot. And I've been letting go of some of the must-blog-tonight pressures that I get occasionally. It does make each blog post more meaningful for me that way.

Lately, I've been bit by the knitting bug. I know I've mentioned it a few times in the past couple of weeks, but I thought I'll show you some of the things I've made. They're all beginner projects and I'm still slowly learning my way through the various techniques, but most surprisingly, I'm enjoying it a hell lot. Oh yeah! I didn't think I was the patient kind to sit in a corner and do something that involved oh-so-much-painful repetition, occasional shoulder aches, frequent rubbing of tired eyes and a whole lot of staring. I won't be surprised if my eye doctor frowns at my next test results.

(My first knitting project - a garter scarf)

I started this scarf a long time ago. Sort of towards the end of last winter. I was pretty shocked that it was not getting over as soon as I was hoping it would. Then rolled around Spring and I was still telling the husband that no matter what season it was when my scarf was ready, he had to wear it for that whole day outside. He gulped and agreed. Thankfully for him, I couldn't sit with that wool scarf on my lap - it was too hot to be in contact with anything like that. So when November came, I picked it up and this time, finished it much faster than I had spent on it in March. When I look at it from end to end, I can easily identify the beginner section because that's where there are a few sloppy mistakes and careless knitting.

Cabled bracelet
Next, I made this cute little cabled bracelet - I wanted to practice some cables (that twirly pattern) and while I love how cables look, they are a hell lotta pain to knit. Now I'm making a lace scarf for myself and it's still in the very initial stages but I hope to finish it this week.

So now you see why I've been barely around. But I do have a lot of books I want to talk to you about so I'm hoping to get a few reviews out this week. How have you been doing?

Comments

Bryan G. said…
Eh. I've been doing okay. :) Reading-wise, not great, but otherwise, life is good. Hope to get to some reading over Thanksgiving. I don't think there's anything such as "must blogging." Again :).
Ti Reed said…
I used to knit up some simple things but I have long since forgotten how. I want to take it up again. Oh, and I have been reading too but not nearly as much as I normally do.
Sam_TinyLibrary said…
I love the bracelet, it's just the kind of thing I would wear. I used to enjoy knitting but never graduated beyond scarves!
Going from garter stitch straight to cables is a pretty impressive jump! I used to knit so much more than I do now (my favorites were always knitting hats on double pointed needles), it's such a calming hobby :)
Laurie C said…
Nice scarf! Sounds like you have a very supportive husband! ;)
Diane D said…
I applaud you. My daughter is a self-taught knitter who now has 2 published books and load of patterns. She encourages me constantly to try it, but I just feel I don't have the patience to learn how to knit:)
Delia (Postcards from Asia) said…
That is a nice way to spend the time. I used to knit years ago, made a scarf and some sweaters for myself. Where I live now it's too hot to wear any of these things but I enjoy admiring them. What's your next knitting project?
Vasilly said…
Nice scarf! It's always fun to try something new and amaze yourself.
Athira / Aths said…
This is probably that season when reading doesn't happen all that much, what with the holiday season and all.
Athira / Aths said…
I didn't realize how much I would enjoy knitting. I should have started long back. But we'll see how long this lasts.
Athira / Aths said…
The bracelet was very easy to make. I finished it in an hour. If you ever take up knitting again, let me know and I'll send you the pattern. :)
Athira / Aths said…
It is an amazing hobby. I usually love wearing anything knitted, so it feels good to be able to make something rather than buy it.
Athira / Aths said…
Thank you! I hope you give it a try - it could be your biggest hobby. :)
Athira / Aths said…
Oh yeah! He is an awesome sport about a lot of things. :)
Athira / Aths said…
That's wonderful about your daughter. Could you share the names of the books she wrote? I would love to take a look through them. :)
Athira / Aths said…
I just realized that if we moved to a place with a much warmer climate, knitting is going to go out the window. Just let my husband know about it too so that he doesn't suggest that ever. :)


I'm making a lace scarf right now, though I'm not really using a lacy yarn. But it seems to come along fine. I should hope to finish it this week.
Athira / Aths said…
Oh it is! I was worried that the time-consuming nature of knitting will put me off, but so far, so good.
Diane D said…
One book is called - Weekend Hats - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1596684380/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=211189&creative=373489&creativeASIN=1596684380&link_code=as3&tag=bibbythesea-20
and the other is New England Knits - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1596681802/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=211189&creative=373489&creativeASIN=1596681802&link_code=as3&tag=bibbythesea-20
Athira / Aths said…
Thanks for letting me know! I remember seeing the latter book somewhere, a long time ago - I remember that cover strongly, though from where, I don't recollect. I will be checking these books out.
Helen Murdoch said…
I learned to knit when I lived in Germany. The mom of the family where I lived was shocked that I was 20 and didn't know how to knit. It is definitely a skill I pick up every few years to do a small and quick project (who are we kidding, it's usually a scarf)
Athira / Aths said…
I should try crocheting then. I didn't really know what crocheting is. I just went for knitting, because it seems to be the more popular hobby, by name. Crocheting does sound like something I will enjoy.
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, scarves are real fun to make. I'm feeling so comfortable with them that I don't feel like graduating to the next level. Who wants to think too much when they knit?

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