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The Sunday Salon: Gone hiking

The Sunday 
Salon.com

Happy Easter, to those who celebrate it! I hope you have a memorable day!

I woke up this morning to a bright beautiful day. Much as I am a very winter girl, it does feel very good to step out of the freezing cold (again!) and dreary week that we just had. Our plants seemed to have thrived the cold blast, but I wouldn't want another one like that any time soon.

We are thiscloseto finishing up our Spring cleaning. Man, this chore can be such a pain in the *&%$! Being very OCD doesn't help either, because I end up spending a lot more time cleaning something than my husband does. He is usually in and out of a room very quick, while I'm still scrubbing that forgotten baseboard or that almost invisible mark on the bathroom mirror.

Last night, my brother arrived from Detroit and will be staying with us for a while. He is much happier to be in a warmer place with the option of stepping out any time he wants. Because he is epileptic, he has to be dependent on other people's goodwill or public transport to be able to go places, so he has been waiting to come home for quite a while.

On the reading front, I have been listening to Child of Dandelions, with under two hours left. I expect to be able to finish it this week and hopefully review it too. It is actually a YA book (Helen, you may like it) - I went in expecting it to be an adult book. But it's still good and did not leave me cringing. Much.  I also started reading The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, and boy, did I love it right from the first page? It's the most magical book to happen to me since Where'd You Go, Benadette? early last year.

Not my photo, but via Jim Lukach

In another half hour, we are planning to go hike the Sharp Top in the Peaks of Otter nearby. We had done this hike once before and it was strenuous. Very steep throughout but a whole lot of fun. The views are just spectacular. There is one spot where you can see the entire valley and it was the most beautiful sight I had ever seen, so much so that we just sat there for a long time. I'm really looking forward to doing it again. Other than that, we don't have any major plans for the day, except watch Game of Thrones tonight. Last episode was - omg, epic! I just did not see that coming and even a week later, I'm still dazed by it. I am actually glad that I did not read the books because I may not have had that kind of reaction otherwise, but I am now very eager to read those books now.

Comments

Ti Reed said…
I love a good hike. I am not that athletic and huff and puff more than anyone should but I love hiking. Happy Easter! I am cooking up some stuff later and plan to recover from the dust/allergy attack at yesterday's track meet.
Kim Ukura said…
I aspire to be a person who does thorough spring cleaning... but I am not that person :) The last week or so I have been having some clutter rage, so I'm trying to downsize a bit, which sis ort of the same. I hope you guys have a great hike!
bermudaonion(Kathy) said…
What is with the weather lately? I am so ready for sandals weather. Happy Easter to you and your family!
Vasilly said…
What a lovely picture! I'm trying to get a copy of The Storied Life so many bloggers have fallen in love with it. Happy Easter.
readingtheend said…
Have a good time with your brother! I need to spend an evening this week catching up on Game of Thrones -- I've heard about all the craziness in the first two episodes of this season, but I haven't gotten a chance to watch them yet.
Happy hiking! I like you love winter but was done with it.
First, how was your hike?

Second, I liked The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, but I don't know if I loved it as much as many other bloggers that I know, like yourself. I thought it was very solid, though. Where'd You Go Bernadette, though, is a favorite.

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