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On my Nightstand #4

I am so glad that this is a short work-week (well, a 4-day week as opposed to a 5-day week). Work has been more insane, if that's possible. I almost feel like I need to put in more hours this week just to be on top of things. This weekend cannot come soon enough, and I can only hope that I won't be bringing work into my weekend.

The Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows: I picked this book solely on the merit of this author's co-authorship in The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. I'm only four chapters in, but I can say with plenty of confidence that this book is going to be a favorite. It has the same charming voice as Guernsey, the characters are very likable and the writing is quirky and fun to read. I'm not too sure yet what the book is supposed to be about but it doesn't matter - the book is fun and the writing is easy to get lost in.
Evoking the same small town charm with the same great eye for character, the co-author of Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Society finds her own voice in this debut novel about a young debutante working for the Federal Writer's Project whose arrival in Macedonia, West Virginia changes the course of history for a prominent family who has been sitting on a secret for decades. The Romeyn family is a fixture in the town, their identity tied to its knotty history. Layla enters their lives and lights a match to the family veneer and a truth comes to light that will change each of their lives forever.

Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg: Lean In was actually a book I was determined not to read. I don't even remember why but I think it has something to do with some misinformation about the book. I started reading this one this past weekend and love it so far. Sheryl Sandberg shares some of her experiences being a mostly lone woman at the top of the corporate ladder and how, many times, her gender had come in the way of her career aspirations. I have heard many readers say that while this book was a good read, they couldn't relate to it since Sandberg wrote from the perspective of someone working in a corporate company. I think that is possibly true (I would like to finish the book before attesting to that) but I find that I can relate very well with her because I work in a corporate company as well.
Lean In grew out of an electrifying TED talk Sandberg gave in 2010, in which she expressed her concern that progress for women in achieving major leadership positions had stalled. The talk became a phenomenon and has since been viewed nearly two million times. In Lean In, she fuses humorous personal anecdotes, singular lessons on confidence and leadership, and practical advice for women based on research, data, her own experiences, and the experiences of other women of all ages.

Ina May's Guide to Childbirth by Ina May Gaskin: Lately (ever since I attended my childbirth class), I have been toying with the idea of a natural childbirth. Prior to that, I was definite that I was going to need an epidural and a natural childbirth was just not something I wanted to think about. But after watching tons of videos and reading plenty of birth stories, I am not as scared of childbirth as I was previously. (Information certainly helps!) I borrowed this book from the library just to boost my motivation to attempt a natural childbirth as much as I can and take the epidural only if all fails. This book is split into two parts - the first is full of birth stories and the second is home to plenty of facts and information. Right now, I am still in the first section and enjoying reading through the stories.
Drawing upon her thirty-plus years of experience, Ina May Gaskin shares the benefits and joys of natural childbirth by showing women how to trust in the ancient wisdom of their bodies for a healthy and fulfilling birthing experience. Based on the female-centered Midwifery Model of Care, Ina May’s Guide to Natural Childbirth gives expectant mothers comprehensive information on everything from the all-important mind-body connection to how to give birth without technological intervention. Ina May’s Guide to Natural Childbirth takes the fear out of childbirth by restoring women’s faith in their own natural power to give birth with more ease, less pain, and less medical intervention.

Comments

JoAnn @ Lakeside Musing said…
I'd pick up The Truth According to Us based only on my experience withThe Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, too! Hope you have plenty of time to read and relax this weekend... it's almost here!
Kay said…
I've been very curious about Annie Barrows' book. I think many of us have been. Your reaction is the first I've heard and it bodes well. I loved the Guernsey book, but I wasn't sure how much was the aunt's work and how much this author. And good luck with your research into what you'd like to do for childbirth. I can see how the stories would be interesting to read. My daughter is a labor/delivery nurse and I've heard a lot of them. From her point of view, of course. I just know that your nurse will hopefully be of such good help to you. My girl is cheerful, positive, and no-nonsense. Plus she bakes the cupcakes. LOL
Belle Wong said…
I don't know why, but I've never read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie. It's been on my want-to-read list, but I sort of forgot about it. I just put a hold on the audio version at my library :) I have three kids, and the last one was a natural childbirth. It's great that you're researching all your options. Once it's happening, you'll have a pretty good idea what you want. I'm very excited for you!
Mystica said…
Its good to have options. You can then make an informed decision.
I am VERY excited to hear that the Annie Barrows book is solid. I have been awaiting verdicts from other bloggers before picking it up. Should've got it at the library today! I can't believe I forgot to do that!
Lisa Sheppard said…
I've felt the same way as you did about Lean In - that it's just something I'm not going to read. But maybe...I hope slows down for you soon so you can be rested and ready when the baby arrives!

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