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The Sunday Salon: Can I go on vacation already?

The Sunday 
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Currently / Shreya wakes up way too early on weekends! I am not sure how she gets the memo that it is the weekend but she has been ready to welcome in the day by 6 AM. I'm just thankful it's not a weekday because then I end up feeling like crap in the mornings.

Right now, my mom is playing with her while I have a nice hot cup of tea and type up this post. I have an apple crumble in the oven and I'm just enjoying the yummy fragrance of Fall! It's kind of chilly this weekend which is perfect weather to me though today looks like it's going to be wet as well.

I feel like I wasn't anywhere in bloglandia this past week. Work was busy, life was busy. Also, Shreya snuck her way to her three-month old birthday last week. We still haven't done her photos yet (yikes) so I plan to have a photoshoot today.

Work / has been very busy this past week. I spent a good part of three days doing pretty much the same thing - it was frustrating. When it was finally over, I was able to move on to focusing on my main responsibilities.

Wishing / I could take some time off this week. At this point, I am craving some staycation. But I need to preserve all my vacation hours to be able to go to India in December so I will have to wait for the Thanksgiving holidays instead for a staycation.

Reading / Nothing. I was starting and stopping way too many books so I decided to just not read for a while. I don't think it's a rut - I just have way too many thoughts circling through my head that it is hard to blank my head for a while and just read. Before I began to feel distracted however, I had started Hillary Jordan's When She Woke on Scribd. (Later, I realized that I already owned the ebook - all the more reason for me to catalog my ebooks soon.)

Worrying about / Nanny/Daycare for Shreya. In January, we are going to have to figure out an option for Shreya and honestly, thinking about it is giving me the hives. I cannot even begin to explain how much the idea of having to find someone to care for her is upsetting. I wish there was some way I could care for her instead. It's just depressing. I know delaying won't help at all so I need to find the daycares closer to my office and schedule visits / get on the waiting list.

Making / I'm still working on the sweater for Shreya. The yarn I used is thinner than the recommended yarn for the pattern so I tried to compensate for it by casting on more stitches. Now that the body is done, I wonder if that was still not enough - it's the same size as some of the clothes she currently wears though they do still have plenty of room to grow into. We'll see how that goes. 

Looking forward to / our DC trip in two weeks. I bet it's going to be frigid but I'm looking forward to it anyways. DC is one of my favorite places to visit and what I love to do there is to take the metro to the Capitol, then walk towards the National Monument with several stops in between at the Library of Congress and in the National Mall area. That, to me, is a day well-spent. Nobody agrees with me though so I have volunteered to take several unsuspecting friends and family along the path promising a good day. (Yeah, most of them complained about the walk all evening lalalalalalalala.)


Today / We need to put up our Halloween decor sometime today. We've been dilly dallying on that front but since this is the last weekend before the Halloween weekend, we better tackle it today.

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