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The Sunday Salon: November Graphic Novel Reading

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Happy November and Fall Back day! Those of you in the US, did you get your extra hour of sleep in? Over here, it didn't make any difference because what do babies know about Fall Back and Spring Forward? All the more reason to scrap this disrupting practice.

Halloween last night was fun. We had a huge turnout this time - around 150+ kids. Last year, there was a game at the local school on Halloween night because of which we didn't see many kids but this time, we almost ran out of candy. We dressed the baby up as a lamb. For five whole weepy minutes. Oh, man - she didn't like being in the costume. AT. ALL. I will have to remind her of this reaction during every future Halloween when she gets over-excited about dressing up.

I spent much of last week trying to clear my brain webs. I had been feeling as if I was all over the place and the lack of a consistent routine has been making me feel like I need to catch up. Although stuff will still continue to accumulate (Feedly, TBR, knitting queue), I feel less bothered by those now.

Next month, we will be heading to India for a one-month trip. I have started thinking about what all we need to pack and what we will need in our carry-on luggage. We usually don't start thinking about packing this early - we thrive in last minute packing. Now however, I don't want to end up wishing I had not forgotten that baby bib or that baby carrier, hence the early planning. Have any of you flown long distance with an infant / toddler? Any advice for this terrified mom?

Since the next couple of months are going to be insanely busy, I've decided to focus on easy and comfort reads, if at all reading will happen. That means graphic books and Harry Potter. It has been a long time since I had a graphic book spree so my TBR has been piling up slowly. I usually like to read graphic books in spurts so it's finally time to do one of those. Friday, I went and borrowed five books from the library (El Deafo, Saga Vol. 1, The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage, Blue is the Warmest Color, and March Book 1) and cannot wait to dig in. Would you like to join me in reading graphic novels and memoirs?




As for Harry Potter, The Estella Society is hosting a Harry Potter Binge starting November 1st and ending January 31st. I have been trying to reread these books for a while but I always end up thinking about all those other books I could read instead. Now however, since not much reading is happening, reading an old favorite sounds just perfect to me.

My rest of the day is shaping up to having no plans whatsoever - my best kind of weekend. This week is going to be extra busy at work so I'll be thankful for any kind of relaxation I can get today.

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