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Waltzing in the Music City | Weekly Snapshot

If you're in the US, do you have Monday off from work or school, to observe President's Day? All of us at our home do, which is lucky because this isn't a day that every company or institution observes with a day off. Even though it's not been too long since the Christmas and New Year holiday season, I'd been pining for a vacation for a while - something either low-key or relaxing that even the kids will enjoy.


Currently This post is coming to you from the Music City - Nashville - where we are spending the long weekend. We are technically here only for two days and will leave early on Monday so that we are home in time to pick our dog from boarding. Although I don't personally care much for the music scene other than to listen to what's popular on the radio, I had been hoping to stop by Nashville someday and check it out.

We are staying at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, which is a sight in itself, with its acres and acres of gardens and walkways. It's def…

Books in the bag (India trip Part 1) | The Sunday Salon

This is where I am going to ignore the fact that it's been a month since we got back from India. Because I am still working on my posts about that trip. You know how that goes when you don't have time to even get the camera out and gather the photos.

Butttttt, I've been working on this post for a while, if not by actually writing it, then by composing it mentally. One of my plans for the trip even before leaving was to visit a certain bookstore when we were in the husband's town and grab books written by Indian authors. I had been to that store (DC books) four years ago and had a vague memory of seeing many shelves of such books. However, when we went this time, we didn't see as many books by Indian authors as I had imagined there would be. That was a bummer but we still got some good books there.

A week later, we were in Chennai when we decided to go to another bookstore (Starmark) at a mall. This wasn't in the plans so I am glad this happened because this is where I bought the bulk of my books. The book selection here was great even in the kids section - I just did not get as many kiddie Indian books as I wanted to. I think, truthfully, I didn't really have an idea about what I was looking for so that made the hunting much harder.


I counted 13 books in total, plus 6 picture books for the kid. Of these, 11 are books I bought and 2 (Aarushi and Best Indian Short Stories) are books gifted by a childhood friend of mine, who I was meeting after a decade (more about this in my next post about the trip).

Books I'm most excited about
  1. Sleeping on Jupiter by Anuradha Roy: this one was in the news recently after being nominated for the Man Booker Prize. It was bumped up on my TBR when Dolce Bellezza reviewed it here.
  2. The Smoke is Rising by Mahesh Rao: Rao's One Point Two Billion is probably the more popular book right now (plus the cover of that book is one of the best ever!) but I liked the sound of this book more. Maybe I will find a way to get hold of One Point Two Billion some other day.
  3. Chemmeen by T. S. Pillai: Chemmeen is one of the most famous movies to come out of Kerala. I could never make myself watch the movie - growing up, I have seen too many people cry at the ending. I guess I am now old enough to acquaint myself with the story. No? Let me start with the book.
  4. Mrs. Funnybones by Twinkle Khanna: I had heard of Twinkle Khanna as an actress, not a writer. I don't think her acting career is going right now, if at all anywhere, but she does have several fans as a writer.  
  5. Aarushi by Avirook Sen: This narrative about the true life murder of a teenage girl and her family's servant only recently came to my spotlight. I did watch the movie about the murders and although it looks like the murders are still mostly unresolved, I am looking forward to reading about it.
  6. Shikhandi by Devdutt Pattanaik: This book has been on my TBR for a long time, ever since it was released. It's also top of my list right now to read so hopefully, I will get to it sooner than later.
  7. Honour by Elif Shafak: This is the lone book in this list NOT by an Indian author. Shafak has long been an author I want to read so I'm excited about this one.

Other exciting finds
  1. The City of Devi by Manil Suri
  2. Yasmeen by Sophia Khan
  3. Racists by Kunal Basu
  4. Best Indian Short Stories by Khushwant Singh
  5. The Lives of Others by Neel Mukherjee
  6. Half of What I Say by Anil Menon

The Sunday 
Salon.comHave you read any of these titles? These books have been sitting by my shelves for the better part of a month and I have managed to not pick any to read until I got this post out and cataloged these titles on my spreadsheet.

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