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Reading and Running | This Week's Five

1. Cape Cod Vacation

Last weekend, we were at Cape Cod. We didn't really go anywhere while we were there but we did catch a glimpse of one of the island's famed lighthouses and spent a morning playing ball at a beach. Much of the weekend was spent basking in the pond beside the house we rented. They had kayaks, pedal boats, paddle boards, bikes, and billiards / ping pong / air hockey tables - something for everyone in the group. It was a very relaxing weekend.

Our return wasn't that smooth however. Our connection flight from Charlotte got canceled because a storm system was moving through town and all flights were grounded. It was quite the sight - everything motionless outside. As hard as it was for us to sit at our gate for hours waiting for the next flight, I am sure it was worse for those passengers still trapped inside their planes, waiting for the storm to pass.



2. Reading Saga

The husband and I have been reading Saga since last night. I believe he is through the big five volumes while, being a slow reader, I am just halfway through the third volume. If you haven't read any reviews yet, then let me echo everything that everyone has been saying about this series - it is exciting, full of rich characters and circumstances, with an amazing diversity in the character representation, and very hard to put down. The protagonist being a new mother is an added bonus. On the one hand, I love that this is a continuing series while on the other, I don't know that I can wait patiently for the next book, and the next, and the next. Plus, comic books aren't exactly cheap, you know.



3. The babe

Shreya is 10.5 months old right now. She is growing so fast that I am already missing everything she did yesterday and wish I could go back in time some. Right now, she is trying to walk by herself. She does take a step or two before she falls down. She also loves climbing our hutch (!!!!) and can easily understand some words already. She seems to know when she is being mischievous because she has that naughty grin that melts my resolve. She loves playing in the water and when we were at the cabin, she and I stayed in an inflated "boat" and cruised through the pond.

We have started planning for her first birthday - the venue has been booked and the guest list has been drawn. I am still wrestling with a theme so if you have an idea, let me know!



4. Summer Reading. Or not.

I'm still trying to decide what books I want to focus on this summer. I don't usually make summer reading lists but lately, I have been craving for some structure in my reading. Of course, as soon as I impose a structure, I'm off to reading whatever else I want to read. So, if anything at all, I'd like to make a reading list just to get over this hump. Oh, and love all those reading lists you guys have been posting!



5. Running.

Inspired by the lot of you, I have taken up running. Granted, it's only been a couple of days but I am hoping I keep this going through the summer. I've always wanted to run a race and while I haven't signed up for anything yet, I am keeping my eyes and ears open for any in the neighborhood. The only reason I haven't been working out yet was because I didn't really have any spot in my daily routine where I can squeeze it into. So I've been trying to get running first thing every morning. It's easier during weekends so we'll see how it goes this week. Send me some cheers!


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