Skip to main content

Featured Post

When you are LOST in a book | Weekly Snapshot

I have just spent a bulk of my past 24 waking hours racing through the book Big Little Lies. Gosh, it feels amazing to be so consumed by a book that all you want to do is read it at every small or big opportunity. It was hard putting the book down or not thinking about Madeline, Jane, Celeste, or their terribly convoluted lives when I was supposed to be doing something else.


Last Week We drove back from Nashville on Monday morning after two full fun days at the Gaylord resort and one morning at the Hermitage, President Jackson's house. The house itself was glorious (and huge!) - we all enjoyed a good amount of history that day. The resort was a feast for the eyes - all those trees and gardens inside the massive building!

On our drive back home, we had couple of hours to kill so we took the kids to the Dinosaur World in Kentucky. That turned out to be a good decision as the kids had a blast and the adults also had fun learning something new.

Currently This weekend is so far turning…

BusyTown and Little Critter | From the kids' bookshelves

I don't recall if I ever mentioned this before - my daughter LOVES books. She can't read by herself yet though she knows her letters and understands the concept of print awareness. If you volunteer to read a book, she's definitely going to be in the audience. My son hasn't shown a lot of interest in books yet - he is more into destroying stuff and tearing papers so I'm taking my time with him.

Most days, the only time my daughter and I get to curl around a book is before bedtime. So we make a big deal out of it - some days, we negotiate with each other on how many books should be read that night. She's always for more, the merrier. I try to keep an eye on the clock. No matter how many books we read, we do make it fun. She usually has at least one question per page, so it's a while before we are done.

Richard Scarry's BusyTown

While we do read different books and authors, some weeks, I try to focus on a particular author or series. Last couple of weeks, we've been reading a few books set in the BusyTown world by Richard Scarry. I've only recently discovered his work but love the few books of his that we've read. We went through his Best Christmas Book Ever at least twice (and it was well past Christmas). Recommend this strongly!



Little Critter books

This week, we're re-reading some of the I Can Read books, starting with the Little Critter stories. I'm slowly working my daughter towards a point where she feels ready to read simple words by herself. Her teacher often shares that she does very well in language so I've been looking to reinforce some of the lessons when we read together. I love that with these books, you also get to teach certain practical concepts. Just Saving my Money, for instance, talks about doing chores to earn money that you can eventually use to buy something you need. As soon as we were done with that book, guess who volunteered to help unload the dishwasher?

  

Other books we loved this week

Pete the Cat is always a fun read - we are always on the lookout for one we haven't read yet. However, one of our best finds last week was Stick Kid - a story about a stick kid that the narrator has drawn in a book and how that stick kid grows up, goes to school, and goes on to have a life. We raced through it twice. 



I'm always looking for recommendations in the picture books category - what's a favorite of yours that you recommend?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hell-Heaven by Jhumpa Lahiri (Short Fiction Review)

I first read Jhumpa Lahiri years ago, when her Interpreter of Maladies was making a huge buzz. At the time, I didn't catch any of the buzz, but for some reason, when I saw the book on the shelf at the store I was browsing in, I felt it just might be a decent read. Funnily, I read the entire short story collection without complaining about it, but for some reason, I cannot read any collection anymore without agonizing over its disjoint nature.

I did enjoy Interpreter of Maladies, but I did get bothered by the thread of loneliness and infidelity and distrust that laced through the stories. For that reason, I have been reluctant to read Unaccustomed Earth. However, when I came across Hell-Heaven at the NewYorker - a free short story from her book, I decided to go ahead and read it. I can't resist the pull of stories set in India or featuring Indian characters, and it is that same aspect that hooked me throughout this story.


In Hell-Heaven, the narrator contemplates the relations…

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Maybe that’s what religion is, hurling yourself off a cliff and trusting that something bigger will take care of you and carry you to the right place.
Bernadette Fox has a reputation. While her husband and her daughter Bee love her, there's barely anyone else who share the sentiment. Her neighbor Audrey loves to gossip mean things about her with her close friend, Soo-Lin. The other parents of kids at Bee's school look down on Bernadette because she doesn't involve herself in school affairs. Bernadette herself goes out of her way to avoid company.

And then one day, Bee comes home with an excellent report card and asks for her reward - a family trip to Antarctica. The very plan throws Bernadette into a panic but she has no other option. She hires a virtual assistant, based out of India to take care of all her demands, including getting prescriptions at her local pharmacy, doing her online shopping and taking care of some of the logistics of her trip. (It is ridiculous! Bern…

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson (Short Fiction review)

With the Hunger Games hype that engulfed us last week, it was hard to avoid all the discussion of similar works that existed. Of the many titles that I came across, two stood out particularly - a short story called The Lottery and a Japanese novel (and movie) called Battle Royale (which I'm reading right now and just cannot put down). The novel will be fodder for another post, so for now, I just want to rave about the awesomeness that was The Lottery.

In contemporary America, villagers across the country are gathering on the 27th of June (and some a day earlier) for an annual event called the Lottery. Children, women, men, all come to the main square of their village or town, where the lottery master keeps a black box full of paper chips. One of these chips is marked has a special mark on it to identify the winner (the person who draws that chip). Not everyone draws however, but only the head of the family. Husbands are viewed as the head of their families/households, and if the …