Skip to main content

Featured Post

When you are LOST in a book | Weekly Snapshot

I have just spent a bulk of my past 24 waking hours racing through the book Big Little Lies. Gosh, it feels amazing to be so consumed by a book that all you want to do is read it at every small or big opportunity. It was hard putting the book down or not thinking about Madeline, Jane, Celeste, or their terribly convoluted lives when I was supposed to be doing something else.


Last Week We drove back from Nashville on Monday morning after two full fun days at the Gaylord resort and one morning at the Hermitage, President Jackson's house. The house itself was glorious (and huge!) - we all enjoyed a good amount of history that day. The resort was a feast for the eyes - all those trees and gardens inside the massive building!

On our drive back home, we had couple of hours to kill so we took the kids to the Dinosaur World in Kentucky. That turned out to be a good decision as the kids had a blast and the adults also had fun learning something new.

Currently This weekend is so far turning…

Work Hard, Play Hard | Weekly Snapshot

Where did this week fly off to? I know I generally feel that way at the end of each week but this time I sure didn't anticipate how busy work would get, especially as we approached the end of the week. At work, a few process changes were introduced that makes the focus of the next couple of weeks very different from what was initially planned. As always, sudden pivot in direction tends to come with very little notice or time to prepare, so by 2pm on Friday, having delayed lunch and forced to delegate most of my work for the day, I was still scrambling to adapt to the change. Needless to say, I didn't manage to finish my work and will have to spend some time tonight, taking care of whatever needs done before Monday. All I can say is, the long weekend cannot be here soon enough.


Currently

After the mad scramble on Friday, I wasn't sure I would be able to unwind enough over the weekend, but thankfully it has been relaxing. Yesterday, the girl had her gym and swim lessons, and I had my hair appointment. Today, we are planning to hit the mall for some window shopping, mostly because last week has been somewhat dreary due to the mix of cloudy, rainy, and snowy days. Speaking of, we had a minor snow system pass through between Friday and yesterday. Although it was barely more than a dusting, schools were surprisingly called off. That's very unusual for here. While snow continued to fall lightly on Friday morning, by afternoon the sun had come out and melted it all. If you peeked outside right now, you couldn't say that it snowed at all.

The girl is still hoping that she will get to build a snowman this winter. I doubt she'll get lucky though - while we've had several frigid weeks here in Southwest Ohio, it has been a mostly mild winter.

Work

Work's going to be intense this week. I know I'm not looking forward to it. We've had a few challenges over the last few months and much of that is going to come to focus this week. We'll see how it rides out.

Looking ahead

I'm honestly dreading my to-do list. I've let it slide for a few weeks now, taking care of only what's necessary. Some wise person did say somewhere that that was a good way to tackle your to-do list - since it ensured you took care of what's needed and let the unnecessary slide. (Sorry I don't remember where I read this.) But I'm not too sure. True, I'm more efficient at last minute. That adage of a task taking up all the time you give it is certainly true in my case. So I tend to give myself very limited time to do something - much to the angst of the husband who is so punctual that it isn't unusual for him to arrive somewhere before even the hosts have arrived. But, always watching the clock is also stressful. I don't seem to ever be caught up, to the extent that I joke it's never really possible to be caught up. There must be some truth there, right? If you are done with something, wouldn't you find something else to do, and thus create more deadlines for yourself?

Later this Spring, we are considering making a trip to India to visit family. However, before that, we have a lot of paperwork to take care of, it's daunting. But we do need to get started on it or we will be late beyond recovery. I'm hoping we can at least take stock of what needs to be done and plan it out.

Reading

Despite the busyness of this week (or maybe because of it?), I had a very good reading week. It took me years to realize that if I pick big wordy books to read, I need to read them in big chunks. So I devoted much of my week to verse and short books. It's funny - books written in verse never made my TBR in the past. And yet, I've been devouring them this week.

    

Yes - I have been mostly reading African American authors. It wasn't entirely planned - typically I try to bookmark many African American books I come across this month (courtesy of the countless reading lists that's published to celebrate African American History Month), with the intent of referring through the rest of the year, but there were a few I simply couldn't resist. 

Garvey's Choice and Who Was Sojourner Truth? were both wonderful reads and are highly recommended. As for Brown Girl Dreaming, I'm halfway through this book and will hopefully finish this week.

Funnily, my library hold for Such a Fun Age came through last week but I'm not sure I'll finish it in time. With the huge waiting line for the book, I don't want to chance having to returning it halfway done, so I chose to pass over this book for now. It's killing me that I had to do that. Has that ever happened to you with a top TBR book?

On the blog

This Week


Linking with The Sunday Salon at Readerbuzz and The Sunday Post at Caffeinated Reviewer.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Hell-Heaven by Jhumpa Lahiri (Short Fiction Review)

I first read Jhumpa Lahiri years ago, when her Interpreter of Maladies was making a huge buzz. At the time, I didn't catch any of the buzz, but for some reason, when I saw the book on the shelf at the store I was browsing in, I felt it just might be a decent read. Funnily, I read the entire short story collection without complaining about it, but for some reason, I cannot read any collection anymore without agonizing over its disjoint nature.

I did enjoy Interpreter of Maladies, but I did get bothered by the thread of loneliness and infidelity and distrust that laced through the stories. For that reason, I have been reluctant to read Unaccustomed Earth. However, when I came across Hell-Heaven at the NewYorker - a free short story from her book, I decided to go ahead and read it. I can't resist the pull of stories set in India or featuring Indian characters, and it is that same aspect that hooked me throughout this story.


In Hell-Heaven, the narrator contemplates the relations…

Where'd You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Maybe that’s what religion is, hurling yourself off a cliff and trusting that something bigger will take care of you and carry you to the right place.
Bernadette Fox has a reputation. While her husband and her daughter Bee love her, there's barely anyone else who share the sentiment. Her neighbor Audrey loves to gossip mean things about her with her close friend, Soo-Lin. The other parents of kids at Bee's school look down on Bernadette because she doesn't involve herself in school affairs. Bernadette herself goes out of her way to avoid company.

And then one day, Bee comes home with an excellent report card and asks for her reward - a family trip to Antarctica. The very plan throws Bernadette into a panic but she has no other option. She hires a virtual assistant, based out of India to take care of all her demands, including getting prescriptions at her local pharmacy, doing her online shopping and taking care of some of the logistics of her trip. (It is ridiculous! Bern…

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson (Short Fiction review)

With the Hunger Games hype that engulfed us last week, it was hard to avoid all the discussion of similar works that existed. Of the many titles that I came across, two stood out particularly - a short story called The Lottery and a Japanese novel (and movie) called Battle Royale (which I'm reading right now and just cannot put down). The novel will be fodder for another post, so for now, I just want to rave about the awesomeness that was The Lottery.

In contemporary America, villagers across the country are gathering on the 27th of June (and some a day earlier) for an annual event called the Lottery. Children, women, men, all come to the main square of their village or town, where the lottery master keeps a black box full of paper chips. One of these chips is marked has a special mark on it to identify the winner (the person who draws that chip). Not everyone draws however, but only the head of the family. Husbands are viewed as the head of their families/households, and if the …