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Pandemic-fatigue | Weekly Snapshot

It got busy this week! Lots going on at home, work, and otherwise as well.  Life My daughter's school decided to close on Friday, along with several other schools in the area, with some being closed from Thursday. Not enough staff. The school had been on a mask mandate since the beginning of the pandemic, dropping it only for one week when the pandemic had appeared to have stabilized last year. And yet, they dropped the mandate completely at the beginning of this year, when cases were exponentially rising, only to bring it back again starting next week. I've gone from being very annoyed to angry to feeling fatigue in these first two weeks already. I won't lie - we all mask around here and try to avoid going where we don't have a need to be in, and still, we are not taking anything close to the extreme precaution we all took at the beginning of the pandemic. I cannot and don't want to keep my kids home - I have at least that much faith in the schools' precautions

From Rodham to My Grandmother Asked Me... | Six Degrees of Separation

 Six Degrees of Separation is a fun monthly meme hosted by Books are my Favourite and Best


Every month, a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. Books can be linked in obvious ways – for example, books by the same authors, from the same era or genre, or books with similar themes or settings. Or, you may choose to link them in more personal ways: books you read on the same holiday, books given to you by a particular friend, books that remind you of a particular time in your life, or books you read for an online challenge. A book doesn’t need to be connected to all the other books on the list, only to the ones next to them in the chain.



This month’s book is Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld.


Rodham belongs to that category of books that I like the idea of reading but know will never read. Basically this means, the book will be in my TBR forever and I may always talk about reading it, but if an opportunity comes, I'll likely balk. Something about alternate history both intrigues and repels me. I like all the "what-if's?" but it's depressing as hell because that's all it is - a what-if? It's not what actually happened. Reading a book about Hitler being stopped years before he actually was sounds exciting but then that's not true - the truth is harsher but we need to live with it. 


When I saw this month's choice was Rodham, it got me thinking of what other books fell into that bucket - would like to read, but likely never will. It wasn't difficult to come up with one - Game of Thrones. Loved the show. Own the book. Borrowed both the ebook and the audiobook from the library many times. Even listened to about 8 hours of audio. Friends - this book (and sadly this series) likely will never get read by me. It's too wordy and at my present rate of reading books, it will be years before I'm caught up with the series. 


A series that I would like to read to its latest installment, even if there are way too many books in it and could take me forever, is the Harry Bosch series. So far, I've only read one - The Black Echo, when I came out of a high of watching (and loving) The Mentalist. I've borrowed the second book twice from the library but have been in between several other books at the time.


Harry Bosch has a strong connection to Vietnam, having served there during the Vietnam War. Around the same time as when I was reading The Black Echo, I was also reading The Best We Could Do, which is an illustrated memoir by Thi Bui, daughter of two Vietnamese refugees. It happens to be a very powerful book that definitely benefited from its illustrated format.


Another book that I thought was elevated by its format (epistolary in this case) is Where'd You Go, Bernadette? Remember those days when you were reading it for the first time? How I wish I could read it again (for the first time) or find similarly wonderful books.


Since I reached a dead end with that book, I decided to take a little help from Goodreads. Looking at the Readers Also Enjoyed scroll, the book that jumps at me and makes me think could give me all the same feels as during my first time reading Bernadette, is Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. It's a book that comes highly recommended but I haven't yet had a chance to read it.


The title Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine reminds me of Fredrik Bachman titles. They have a very quirky feel and usually makes you want to read them. One of his books that I found quite charming is My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry. Which reminds me - it has been years since I've read his books and I know he's had several out since. 

Looking at my chain, it's fun to see that I started with an alternate history and ended with a charming book.

Have you read any of these books? Where did (or would) your chain take you?

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