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In my TBR this month | Nonfiction November

This is the last week of  Nonfiction November  - this may only be my second time actually following through for all four weeks of this event. Which is great - because I discovered some amazing blogs and several excellent nonfiction titles this month. Doing Dewey  is hosting the week and she's asking -  It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book! I picked up a ton of recommendations this month - these six are the ones I am most looking forward to reading.  Pandemic Solidarity  by Marina Sitrin and Rebecca Solnit - discovered over at Monika's  Lovely Bookshelf  - she has several similar books recommended in her post, and I'll admit I TBR'd almost all of them.  Doughnut Economics  by Kate Raworth -  Unsolicited Feedback  has several other books on this topic but this one in particular caught my eye. I Have Something to Tell You  by Chasten Buttigieg - thi

Book Pairings | Nonfiction November

For this week's Nonfiction November prompt, we are looking at book pairings. Whether you prefer fiction or nonfiction, there's usually a book in the other category that will match your likes. You like crime? No problem. How about history? Yep - there are plenty of choices in fiction and nonfiction. Stories are your thing? Got you covered there as well. 

Julz Reads is hosting the week and she's asking - 


This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title. It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!” or just two titles that you think would go well together. Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history by reading a nonfiction version of the story.



The first pair are for two books I read this year, regarding the custom of bachaposh. While I didn't love either book as much as I hoped to, they have each received very high reviews from other readers. Plus, they explain the custom of bachaposh very well.



Nadia Hashimi has many followers and The Pearl That Broke Its Shell has many fans. If you have read and loved this book or this author, then you may also enjoy The Underground Girls of Kabul - a nonfiction account of how this custom is followed and perceived within Afghanistan.


Another fan-favorite is Shutter Island. Did you love the movie or the book? I can't recall if I watched the movie or read the book first but they were both creepy and had different endings (if my memory is right), which meant you got creeped out twice. 



But no book creeped me out further than real-life "madhouse" experience in Ten Days in a Madhouse. Go on, pick that book, read it! It's very short, very fast, and will have you look at it in disbelief "was it really that easy to get admitted into an insane asylum?" You'll be wondering about your own sanity (insanity, dare I say?) once you finish this book.


And for my third pairing, which is also the first pair that came to me when writing this post, except I couldn't initially connect them together, until I read my notes on both the books. Remember Gillian Flynn's Dark Places? I don't know about you, but with time, this book feels scarier to me. The idea of late night murders scare the heck out of me, so much, that even the 30-something me gets all worked up if I have to get up in the night and step outside the bedroom. Well, it's not that bad, but the thought of murderers waiting in the shadows always cross my mind. 



You want to know of a real-life late-night murder story? Read Truman Capote's In Cold Blood. I made the mistake of listening to this book on audio, which meant I cannot read the words with my eyes half-closed. Nop, I had to listen to every word without skipping. Brr, the shivers! 


Have you read any of these books? What nonfiction book would you recommend to me?

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