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You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins | Thoughts

Published in: 2017
Format read in: ebook
Location: US, Ghana, India
Rating: 3/5Why I read it: I hadn't heard of this book until I was browsing through Goodreads Recommend lists. I was craving some Asian fiction and this sounded good from the synopsis.One line review: A decent picture of an Indian American life that focuses more on familial relationships and how the different generations adapt, but one that does not do their characters justice or truly focus on one theme.Who should read it: If you're a Mitali Perkins fan or want to understand more about immigrants, you may enjoy this. There's something about putting words on a page in private that makes me feel powerful in public.Thoughts:Sisters Tara and Sonia move to Flushing, New York from London when their father gets a job there. Until then, they were Londonites to the core, but were now ready to accept New York as their new home. Tara was especially good at imbibing new cultures and even transforming herself pretty rapidl…

Leif Reads: "I just received Best-kept Lawn Award of the suburbs"


Leif Reads
Every month, Ash and I are going to focus on one eco-related book for Leif Reads. To see what this feature is all about, visit this page. This month, we are reading Slow Death by Rubber Duck by Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie.

Slow Death by Rubber Duck talks about seven toxins that we unwittingly come in contact with - many times a day - as we go through our regular daily routine. Last couple of weeks, Ash highlighted how the toy industry has been introducing our kids to toxins - through plastics in toys, and then I highlighted two toxins/toxin sources that you can easily find in your homes - Teflon (yes, your non-stick frying pan may not be that good for you) and mercury (say goodbye to tuna).

In this week's post, Ash talks about why lawn care is not worth all the hoopla around it. I have this omnipresent image of a respectable family with a home in the suburbs, settling into their dream life, mowing lawns while they gossip with their neighbors about the government's latest crazy law or their kids' silly antics. Of course, that's an image picked straight out of a soap opera or TV show like Desperate Housewives, but it's really not that secluded an image. While most of the elements in that image are good to have, let's talk about that lush green lawn which happens to be your pride and the neighbor's envy. Do you really need one? Well, let me rephrase that. Do you know it can be harmful to your health? Check out Ash's post to find out more.

What have you heard about these or any other toxins commonly found in the household?


Comments

hcmurdoch said…
I'm going to to hop on over to Ash's site to read the article. Because, of course, we have a lawn...
Misha said…
It's scary how we seem to be surrounded by toxins!
I am going to check out the post right now. Thanks for the link!
I've been reading more and more about all the damage we're doing to our planet in our quest for the perfect lawn, so I'm glad to see Ash writing about it. I'm heading over there now.
Athira / Aths said…
I have one back home, and I HAVE to check with my dad on what he does there.
Athira / Aths said…
I agree. This book just made me realize that they are everywhere - that it's impossibly hard to rid ourselves of them but that we should try since this isn't the worst.
Athira / Aths said…
I'm glad she did the post too - I will have to check with my dad on how he takes care of our lawn back home.