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The Memory Police by Yoko Ogawa | Thoughts

Published in: 1994, translated into English in 2019
Format read in: ebook / print
Location: Unknown location
Rating: 5/5Why I read it: I’ve had The Housekeeper and the Professor in my TBR for a long time so when I found another book by the same author available to borrow at Overdrive, I decided to go for it.One line review: This book about forgetting and disappearance will make you wonder how much you take for granted about the little things. Who should read it: If you don't mind a little dystopian fiction in your already dystopian life and if you are okay with open endings, you may enjoy this book. Men who start by burning books end by burning other menThoughts:Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and The Professor has been in my wishlist since around the time I started tracking my reading. And yet, it is The Memory Police that I started reading first. I found this available on Overdrive when I was browsing something new and something unexpected. It definitely fit both expectations and m…

Leif Reads: "I just received Best-kept Lawn Award of the suburbs"


Leif Reads
Every month, Ash and I are going to focus on one eco-related book for Leif Reads. To see what this feature is all about, visit this page. This month, we are reading Slow Death by Rubber Duck by Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie.

Slow Death by Rubber Duck talks about seven toxins that we unwittingly come in contact with - many times a day - as we go through our regular daily routine. Last couple of weeks, Ash highlighted how the toy industry has been introducing our kids to toxins - through plastics in toys, and then I highlighted two toxins/toxin sources that you can easily find in your homes - Teflon (yes, your non-stick frying pan may not be that good for you) and mercury (say goodbye to tuna).

In this week's post, Ash talks about why lawn care is not worth all the hoopla around it. I have this omnipresent image of a respectable family with a home in the suburbs, settling into their dream life, mowing lawns while they gossip with their neighbors about the government's latest crazy law or their kids' silly antics. Of course, that's an image picked straight out of a soap opera or TV show like Desperate Housewives, but it's really not that secluded an image. While most of the elements in that image are good to have, let's talk about that lush green lawn which happens to be your pride and the neighbor's envy. Do you really need one? Well, let me rephrase that. Do you know it can be harmful to your health? Check out Ash's post to find out more.

What have you heard about these or any other toxins commonly found in the household?


Comments

hcmurdoch said…
I'm going to to hop on over to Ash's site to read the article. Because, of course, we have a lawn...
Misha said…
It's scary how we seem to be surrounded by toxins!
I am going to check out the post right now. Thanks for the link!
I've been reading more and more about all the damage we're doing to our planet in our quest for the perfect lawn, so I'm glad to see Ash writing about it. I'm heading over there now.
Athira / Aths said…
I have one back home, and I HAVE to check with my dad on what he does there.
Athira / Aths said…
I agree. This book just made me realize that they are everywhere - that it's impossibly hard to rid ourselves of them but that we should try since this isn't the worst.
Athira / Aths said…
I'm glad she did the post too - I will have to check with my dad on how he takes care of our lawn back home.