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When you are LOST in a book | Weekly Snapshot

I have just spent a bulk of my past 24 waking hours racing through the book Big Little Lies. Gosh, it feels amazing to be so consumed by a book that all you want to do is read it at every small or big opportunity. It was hard putting the book down or not thinking about Madeline, Jane, Celeste, or their terribly convoluted lives when I was supposed to be doing something else.


Last Week We drove back from Nashville on Monday morning after two full fun days at the Gaylord resort and one morning at the Hermitage, President Jackson's house. The house itself was glorious (and huge!) - we all enjoyed a good amount of history that day. The resort was a feast for the eyes - all those trees and gardens inside the massive building!

On our drive back home, we had couple of hours to kill so we took the kids to the Dinosaur World in Kentucky. That turned out to be a good decision as the kids had a blast and the adults also had fun learning something new.

Currently This weekend is so far turning…

Leif Reads: Coop - A Year of Poultry, Pigs, and Parenting


Leif Reads
Happy Earth Day, folks! Ideally on this day, people across the world take a minute to think about the impact our many actions have upon the world. You can choose to do anything at all today - spend an hour unplugged (disconnect all those appliances, your computers and maybe corner a sweet spot in your house with your books), convert someone in your life to actively rather than passively be more eco-aware, or you can choose to contribute online.

After a break of three weeks, Leif Reads has returned with our next book - Coop: A Year of Poultry, Pigs, and Parenting by Michael Perry. This time, we're doing something different and light. Rather than a purely technical book, we are reading a memoir - of a guy who returns to a rural life of farming and agriculture. I can't somehow fathom doing something like that - I am mostly a city person, but not a big-city person. I like the quiet suburban life but I can't imagine doing gardening or farming. Mainly because I never grew up in that kind of life. Besides, bugs frighten me. So reading this book is kind of refreshing - it's doable, but there are trade-offs. Besides, I have heard of a lot of people doing precisely that and come across many such memoirs (Novella Carpenter's Farm City, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver). This book is chosen not to start a mass boycott of cities and urban life (I like to overestimate my influence sometimes) but simply to learn what motivates such people and how we could do it, if we wanted to. Frankly, it's just to encourage farming/gardening (and not be scared of the wee bugs).

Slow Death by Rubber Duck

I can't wait to read this and discuss it. Ash has the first post up on her blog. Head on over there to check her post.

Comments

Nicole said…
I love books like this. Have you read The Bucolic Plague by Josh Kilmer Purcell? SO much fun.
hcmurdoch said…
I am so not a farm girl. It would probably be really good for me to spend time on a farm or in the wilderness to get me accustomed to the bugs, hard physical work, etc.
BibliophilebytheSea said…
Someone suggested this one a while back and I thought nah, but I've been reconsidering....enjoy
Juju at Tales of Whimsy... said…
O I bet I would love the audio book of this one.
Misha said…
Happy Earth Day to you! I have always been a city person too, but my father's family have a farm (in Kerala) - it's so peaceful and pretty.
Stephanie D. said…
I loved Animal, Vegetable, Miracle - it inspired me to patronize truly local establishments, ones that made most products in-house.
Kim (Sophisticated Dorkiness) said…
I hope you enjoyed Coop -- I think Michael Perry is a funny writer, and I enjoyed this book quite a bit when I read it last year.
Marie said…
Coop sounds like so much fun- so interesting and entertaining. I'm going to look for it!
Athira / Aths said…
I remember reading some awesome reviews of The Bucolic Plague, so I have it in my TBR. Thanks for reminding about it, I'm going to check it out sooner.
Athira / Aths said…
I tell myself the same thing - that I should try get more intimate with nature and stop being so squeamish about a lot of things. My ancestral home is actually set beside a farm, and the house used to be visited by slugs, snails, snakes, worms, etc very often. My cousin who grew up there barely notice them, but I run in the opposite direction shrieking like a banshee.
Athira / Aths said…
I guess this will make great listening! It does look very entertaining.
Athira / Aths said…
I can relate - both my parents' homes are beside farms - so they grew up closer to the earth. Me, not so much.
Athira / Aths said…
I love it when books like these bring about some change in us - a little bit at a time. I have heard that Kingsolver's book is very inspirational in that aspect.
Athira / Aths said…
I am still reading this one, but yes, I am totally enjoying it - it's fun!
Athira / Aths said…
It is very interesting! I wasn't expecting to be so pulled into it.

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