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In my TBR this month | Nonfiction November

This is the last week of  Nonfiction November  - this may only be my second time actually following through for all four weeks of this event. Which is great - because I discovered some amazing blogs and several excellent nonfiction titles this month. Doing Dewey  is hosting the week and she's asking -  It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book! I picked up a ton of recommendations this month - these six are the ones I am most looking forward to reading.  Pandemic Solidarity  by Marina Sitrin and Rebecca Solnit - discovered over at Monika's  Lovely Bookshelf  - she has several similar books recommended in her post, and I'll admit I TBR'd almost all of them.  Doughnut Economics  by Kate Raworth -  Unsolicited Feedback  has several other books on this topic but this one in particular caught my eye. I Have Something to Tell You  by Chasten Buttigieg - thi

One Plus One by Jojo Moyes


A Man Called Ove
She couldn't tell him that things would change before he knew it, because when you were a teenager your life really only stretches in your imagination about two weeks ahead, and they both knew that it wasn't going to get better by then. Or, probably, any time soon after that.

Jojo Moyes is one of those authors I would never have read or tried to read. When I first attempted Me Before You, I closed it after the first chapter, because it smacked of a fluff novel with a rich good looking guy with a vapid girlfriend and who knows which predictable direction this novel would take. Months later, I found myself without an audiobook to listen to, and Me Before You was what I chose. I very rarely go back to a book I abandoned. But, Me Before You worked. It more than worked. It rocked.

One Plus One fared similarly. I wouldn't go as far as to say that it was as good as Me Before You. One Plus One was more predictable. But it was also funny, witty, and filled with misfits.

One similarity between these two books is that her male protagonists start off as men you hate at first glance. They are too self-important, too rich, too brainless, and too shallow. Over time, they reveal a side of theirs that was, for whatever reason, hidden in the first few chapters. Also, it took a poor working-too-hard woman to save them from their egos.

Apart from that common formula, the two books differed in every other possible way. In One Plus One, Jess Thomas works as a cleaner by day and a barmaid by night, trying to make ends meet and put two kids through school. Her husband, who doesn't contribute a dime, had moved away whining that he needs to fix his health and look for a job. Ed Nicholls is a rich-guy-done-bad-thing who is staying low after he took part in insider trading. His house is one of those that Jess cleans, and as is the wont with novels (and movies) like this one, the two start off on the wrong foot. Jess's husband's son, Nicky, is constantly bullied by some boys at school and in his neighborhood. Her daughter, Tanzie, is a math genius who just got the opportunity to study at a rich but great school on a scholarship, if her family can cough up five grand to cover up their share of the costs.

The problem? There is no five grand in their house, or money bag, or piggy bank, waiting to be used. So Jess decides to drive her brood and their dog all the way to Scotland where a Math Olympiad was being held in a few days, in her husband's ragged old Rolls Royce, hopeful that Tanzie will win the prize that will send her to the school of her dreams. But then, the car breaks down, a cop writes her a ticket, and Ed chances by. He volunteers to take them to Scotland. Besides, he needs to visit his dying father anyways.

What follows is a few days of fun, irritation, temper flares, and plenty of outbursts. It's amazing how much can be written about a car journey, even if it spanned a few days. I was half-wishing for a similarly eventful car-ride, but the only long ones I've had have usually been full of dramas. What I liked about One Plus One was how much I ended up caring for some of the characters. Misfit or not, there was something about each character that made you want to sit next to them. Sure, the story is very predictable, and sure, it reminded me a little about Maid in Manhattan (which I didn't like at all), but at the end of the day, Moyes's characters had a lot of personality and presence that made you read the book just to stay with them. I didn't want the book to end and move on. I didn't want anything bad to happen to them, which was what I was anticipating after reading Me Before You.

One Plus One is what I wish Sophie Kinsella's novels were more like. Light women's fiction with a rich-guy-meets-poor-gal script, but where the girl has brains and can hold her own kingdom.


I received this book for free for review from the publisher, Pamela Dorman Books, via NetGalley.
Armchair reading in United Kingdom

Comments

Vasilly said…
This sounds like a fun read. I keep hearing about how great Moyes's books are but haven't read one yet. I'll probably read Me Before You first. Nice review. :-)
I was surprised and delighted with The Girl You Left Behind, and I want to read another one of Moyes's books soon. I love her writing and I felt happy when I finished the book -- sounds like this one is as charming (if not more).
Lisa Sheppard said…
Definitely not Me Before You but then not much is as good as that one was. Moyes just packs here books with so much wit and humanity that I'm more than willing to overlook any flaws.
literaryfeline said…
You almost make me want to read this one. :-)
JoAnn @ Lakeside Musing said…
I've read 4 of Moyes' books in the last ten months. This sounds like another good one, but I may take a break for a month or two ;-)
Diane said…
Aww, this does sound good. I just started the audio of Landline; Rainbow Rowell and am enjoying it.