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An early weekend Salon: Frazzled from a hectic week

I wanted to type up this post and schedule it for Sunday, which is what I would usually do if I were going to be out of town during a weekend. But seeing as I haven't been too regular with my posting lately, I didn't think it mattered when I posted. The husband, his father, and I are heading north today to New Jersey to meet up with some friends and also because my father-in-law is flying back to India on Sunday. Remember my post from a few months back about how long it took to travel door-to-door between our home in India and here? Well, it's time for the return journey.


frazzled


This week has been absolutely insane at work. I felt like my thoughts were all over the place and my patience thisthin. We had all kinds of issues, tempers, and people flare up and have pretty much been told to stop whatever we are doing and work on something more important. I never like it when this happens because so much seems to happen at the same time and every one feels as if they are walking around in a daze with their heads pounding, irritable moods surfacing up, and coffee cups being refilled continuously. I am just glad that it is the weekend finally. I would like nothing better than to sit at home, read, and knit, but of course, I'm in a car reading and knitting. Oh well. At least, I won't have to work from home so it's probably better than I am on the road. I was initially supposed to travel to Alabama this week to help a customer but that got canceled in the end, so I am relieved I don't have to plan for that as well.

Anyways, my knitting has finally transitioned from being a frenetic activity to something that gives me more time to pursue other interests. I am still undecided on which unread book to read but I have picked up the first Harry Potter book. I am quite eager to read Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake or The Blind Assassin, and if the next week can be less dramatic and less loaded compared to this week, I could possibly accomplish some good reading. There's nothing more frustrating than being faced with a busy week when you finally decide that you want to read a book. Ugh.

Anyways, I have a ton of reviews to post so I could afford doing some rereading while I'm at it. I started listening to The Emperor of all Maladies this week and am feeling underwhelmed by how technical it is. It is fascinating but not enough to stop my mind wandering which happened often this week, what with work being crazy. Still, I'll keep listening to it and hopefully, I'll know more about cancer by the time I am done with it. What is up in bloglandia?

Comments

bermudaonion(Kathy) said…
Ugh, I hate weeks like that! I hope things get better at work.
My work week went pretty well right up until the last half hour and then almost ruined my whole week. Almost. We apologized before leaving, but still it made, is making me, think/rethink how I need to handle the stress better than I have been. Maybe I really should take up knitting. ;)
Ugh, sorry everything's been hectic at work! I hope people are able to calm down a bit in the upcoming week. On Friday I woke up at 3:45 AM because of a thunderstorm, couldn't get back to sleep, and subsequently forgot to bring coffee to work. Sooooo that was a fun day. :p I'm so glad coffee exists in this world, I would be wretched without it.
JoAnn @ Lakeside Musing said…
Weeks like that are the worst! I sure hope the week ahead is calmer. I've had The Emperor of All Maladies in and out of my audible shopping basket so many times I've lost count... it sounds fascinating, but them I'm not sure about listening to all the technical stuff. Guess I'll hold off a little longer.
bellezza said…
Well, in a way its comforting to know that other friends have work issues making their patience thisthin (wonderful way to put it!). I don't wish harm on you ever, but I'm glad I'm not alone. Plus, how did you get a before and after picture of me for your post? :)
Diane D said…
Hope this week is better for you. Working in an academic setting, everyone tends to be pretty low key for an unstressed environment -- guess I'm lucky.
literaryfeline said…
Do we work in the same place? It felt like that last week in my office. And I can relate to wanting to spend time with a book but having so much work to do . . .


I am hoping this week will be better, but I'm not sure. My car wouldn't start this morning, which threw me off. I can't afford to miss work right now, not with my surgery date coming up so fast. So my husband got to take my car in (he's been so good about my lack of flexibility given I've always been the more flexible one) and I have his car. My poor daughter had to get up at the crack of dawn because that meant me taking her to school instead of her dad . . . Not a good start to the week.


I hope your week is much better!
Ti Reed said…
What line of work are you in? Sounds an awful lot like mine. I am in IT communications and there are never any true deadlines. It's always, drop everything and work on this NOW. I hate that because a lot of the time, we could be working on the launch ahead of its release but that is not how we do things.
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