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Yet another Monday! (Dec 5, 2011)


It's Monday! What are you reading this week?

Sheila @ One Persons Journey through a world of Books wants to know what we're reading. I'm only too happy to oblige!

Yikes, it's December already! After a long two weeks of some medical drama, busy work weeks and apartment shifting, I'm finally back to reading for what few free days of this month I have. When we were busy shifting, my friend stacked all my books from the shelves against a wall so that he can taunt me about how many books I collect and not read. Of course, he "steals" a few books from me every time he visits, so he shouldn't tease. Besides, I keep telling him that I don't have as many as some of you!

Books finished since the last update
-  Before I go to Sleep by S.J. Watson (Engrossing, but not very memorable)
-  Cabin Fever (Diary of a Wimpy Kid, #6) by Jeff Kinney (Hilarious as always!)
-  The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern (I really loved this one! Very atmospheric)
-  The Silent Land by Graham Joyce (Hadn't heard of this before, but enjoyed it a lot)

News from over my blog

Reviews up!
-   Repeat it Today with Tears by Anne Peile

Other posts
-  An announcement hidden in all my ramblings in this post!
-  What I did when I wasn't around for two weeks

Books on my nightstand
Last week, I started reading one book that I found very engrossing. In addition, there's another one I started and stopped, so I'll be picking that one up again.

NeuromancerNeuromancer by William Gibson: When Care mentioned that she is planning to read this book, I decided to wait a few weeks to read it with her. Unfortunately, things happened, so I'm only now getting to it, and Care should probably have finished it. But it's a good book, so I'm looking forward to reading it.
The Filter BubbleThe Filter Bubble by Eli Pariser: I had been looking forward to reading this book about online privacy. I tend to tighten my social networks to just as much as I can. And with the tons of ways that websites have been making all kinds of information available - like which song I'm listening to, to what articles I'm reading - I wanted a different look at the internet life. So far, this book is great!



Comments

The Night Circus was wild wasn't it? I'm discussing it next Monday in a book group and can't wait to hear what everyone has to say! :)

http://brunettelibrarian.blogspot.com
Helen Murdoch said…
I am so impressed and overwhelmed by your TBR stacks! I thought I had a lot of bought, but not yet read books, but now I feel better! :-)
I just finished The Night Circus but I am still trying to figure out how I feel about it! The Filter Bubble sounds interesting.
Sheila (Book Journey) said…
Love the visual book pile.  So glad to hear you loved Night Circus.
Leeswammes said…
Just a few books there! So these are all the books you haven't read yet? Hmm! I've "only" got 55 of those. But I know people that have over 2,000, so for now, you're fine. 

Have a good week!
Debnance said…
I keep contemplating buying Night Circus. It looks like the kind of book I'd love!

Here's my It's Monday! What Are You Reading?
Lenasledgeblog said…
I'm finishing up Night Circus. It's pretty good so far. So much going on, That I'm not reading as fast as I'd like. Nice stack of books you have there too!
bermudaonion (Kathy) said…
Yeah, I think I could beat you with my stack of books.  :/  I hope you have a great week in books!
The Filter Bubble looks like something many of us should read...enjoy!  I had to laugh at your book stack...reminds me of mine after I moved.

Here's

http://laurelrainsnow.wordpress.com/2011/12/04/monday-from-the-interior-mailbox-monday-what-are-you-reading-dec-5/  
Jackie said…
Definitely adding The Filter Bubble to my TBR list.
zibilee said…
That's a lovely pile of books there that would rival my own! I bet you have some great titles in there! I also think The Filter Bubble sounds interesting, and it would probably be of interest to my husband as well. I can small a Christmas gift coming on...
Vasilly said…
Aths, don't you know book bloggers like clicking on pictures of books?! I was trying to read the titles. ;-) I've read similar thoughts about the Watson book so it's not going on my tbr list anytime soon. Glad to see you're back.
Lindsey Stefan said…
Ok, I love your gigantic pile of books. It's better than collecting ceramics or something, am I right? (No offense to the ceramics collectors of the world...)
I just read Before I Go to Sleep a few weeks ago. I liked it, but I think I don't read mysteries/thrillers as often as literary fiction because I finish them and that's it. The characters and plots don't stick around in my head like those of other books. 
...And cue end of ramblings.
Pussreboots said…
I've put the Filter Bubble on my wishlist. Finals week has kept me busy. Please come see what I'm reading.
Thank you for agreeing with me on Before I Go to Sleep :-)  I love your shelf, it does help when we know it is not as bad others, lol
Rachel said…
Wow what a pile! That is impressive. I'm sure if I let myself my book pile would look like that too but unfortunately our place is just too small so I'm constantly having to purge and give. I've watched the Diary of a Wimpy kid movies and secretly loved them! I don't watch a lot of kids movies but they were great. So maybe I should try out the books.
Athira / Aths said…
Night Circus was totally wild! I simply loved the ride! 
Athira / Aths said…
Ha! I seem to be buying books for decoration and then reading just the library books mostly. Need to change that "sometime". 
Athira / Aths said…
Filter Bubble is interesting. It's chock full of a lot of interesting information. 
Athira / Aths said…
I'm glad that I read the book! 
Athira / Aths said…
I think I have read a few of them, but many are just languishing in my shelves. But they're so pretty and sound awesome! 
Athira / Aths said…
It was awesome! You might like it. :)
Athira / Aths said…
Yay! Glad that you are enjoying it too! I can't wait to hear what you think of it.
Athira / Aths said…
Haha! You were one of the readers I was thinking of when I said some of you have more books than I do. I'm hoping to get there someday, lol!  
Athira / Aths said…
Seems that I get a better idea of how many books I have only when I am moving. 
Athira / Aths said…
I hope you enjoy it. It is very informational.
Athira / Aths said…
I think Filter Bubble will make a great Christmas gift! Especially if your husband enjoys books about technology. 
Athira / Aths said…
Haha! By habit, I edited the link too. But the original picture wasn't too clear on full size, since it was taken on a phone. :( 
Athira / Aths said…
Yeah, that book pretty much vanished from my thoughts after a day or two. I don't read much thrillers either, but I have come across a few really good ones. 
Athira / Aths said…
I hope you enjoy Filter Bubble!
Athira / Aths said…
It does, doesn't it? I'm glad I could stack all of them in a corner - even for that small stack, my friends and I had to make so many trips to and fro.
Athira / Aths said…
You should read the books - they are even better than the movies! Really hilarious!

And I hear you on the book pile size. I don't buy a lot - I find it hard to justify buying a book unless I am standing in one of those must-visit bookstores. 
Care said…
and I just posted my review.  Tho, it's not much of a 'review'.  I do link to one that was really good, tho.  Can't wait to read your insights!

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